NIFL-ASSESSMENT 2005: [NIFL-ASSESSMENT:1295] RE: FW: [NIFL-LD]

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From: bonniesophia@adelphia.net
Date: Tue Oct 25 2005 - 10:52:10 EDT


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From: <bonniesophia@adelphia.net>
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Subject: [NIFL-ASSESSMENT:1295] RE: FW: [NIFL-LD] computer assessment
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 Apologies to the list for sending a personal message. I should never be near electronics jetlagged...
Bonnie
---- bonniesophia@adelphia.net wrote: 
>  Hi, Ajit,
> Great to hear from you from afar. Great stuff about CT PD and all... I'm plugging along at Post University, directing the Writing Center and teachinf First Year foundations and a reading comprehension course. Many of the same types of populations, just younger. Their for-profit status makes life interesting. I'm still singing: just did a lot of Taizé for a pilgrimage to Chartres Cathedral in France, and the Waterbury Chorale is doing a very popular style of program for the Palace. Notr as challenging as one would want, but that's ok; with my schedule, I don't have time for challenge...
> Take care,
> Bonnie Odiorne, Ph.D.
> Director, Writing Center; Adjunct Faculty
> Post University
> 800 Country Club Road
> Waterbury, CT 06708
> writingcenter@post.edu
> bodiorne@post.edu
> ---- Jane Eguez <jeguez@casas.org> wrote: 
> >  
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Gopalakrishnan, Ajit
> > Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2005 11:37 AM
> > To: Marie Cora
> > Subject: RE: [NIFL-ASSESSMENT:1259] Computer assessment and adult
> > learners
> > 
> > I conducted a very small study with 2 programs who piloted the use of
> > CASAS computer-based testing (CBT) with a total of 55 students. This was
> > done a year and a half ago. We collected student and teacher feedback on
> > their experience with implementing CBT. We also aggregated student
> > performance in the reading and math assessments.
> > 
> > My general observations are that CBT is probably not for everyone.
> > Students should definitely be given the choice. That said, staff comfort
> > with the CBT is a pre-requisite for them to be equipped to better guide
> > this student choice. If staff members themselves are intimidated with
> > the technology, they may underestimate a student's ability.
> > 
> > Student reaction was mixed in our little study. Though some students
> > found the CBT to be a difficult experience, many more found it to be
> > easy and a better way of taking the test. The technology has definitely
> > gotten better and more intelligent. Almost all screens of the CASAS CBT
> > for example can be navigated without the use of a mouse which I know can
> > be problematic for some students to master.
> > 
> > Our N was very small but a student's ability level in reading/math and
> > their self-assessment of their computer skills seem to affect their
> > experience with the CBT. Those with lower functioning levels and lower
> > self-assessments of technology abilities rated the CBT as generally
> > being more difficult than others. Nancy's concern about using CBT with
> > students with "LITTLE literacy skills" and also with no computer
> > experience is an important concern. For those of us that use computers
> > everyday, we may not realize how we take so much of our understanding
> > about how a computer works for granted. 
> > 
> > Given the importance of technology today, I prod programs to encourage
> > students to attempt the CBT at some point during their participation in
> > the program, even if they choose not to try it at entry. Many employers
> > have entry assessments now that are computer-based and CBT in our
> > programs can be good preparation for that as well.
> > 
> > CBT can not only change the assessment practices but can also positively
> > impact intake, placement, student feedback, and alignment of assessment
> > to instruction. 
> > 
> > Cheers,
> > Ajit
> > 
> > Ajit Gopalakrishnan
> > Education Consultant
> > Connecticut Department of Education
> > 25 Industrial Park Road
> > Middletown, CT 06457
> > Tel: (860) 807-2125
> > Fax: (860) 807-2062
> > ajit.gopalakrishnan@po.state.ct.us
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Marie Cora [mailto:marie.cora@hotspurpartners.com]
> > Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2005 9:30 AM
> > To: Multiple recipients of list
> > Subject: [NIFL-ASSESSMENT:1259] Computer assessment and adult learners
> > 
> > Hi everyone,
> >  
> > I wanted to prod you all to add your thoughts to Nancy's questions from
> > the other day regarding testing via computers in ABE/ESOL.  What are
> > your thoughts, and what have been your experiences on this?
> >  
> > I have done a little bit of work using the BEST Plus with adult learners
> > - but in that case, it is the teacher/test administrator who actually is
> > using the computer and asking questions of the test-taker.  As an aside,
> > the great thing about this type of computer testing is that the software
> > program automatically stops you when the student has reached as far as
> > they can go, and it also jumps over questions that it realizes the
> > student will have no problem answering.  Thus, you avoid the unnecessary
> > and sometimes painful process of forcing students to answer way too easy
> > questions, for example.
> >  
> > But!  This is not the situation Nancy is describing here - so do folks
> > have thoughts on adult students personally using a computer for
> > assessment purposes?  I am also sending this reply to the
> > NIFL-Technology List to see if folks over there have something to
> > contribute to this discussion.
> >  
> > Thanks!
> > marie
> >  
> > marie cora
> > Moderator, NIFL Assessment Discussion List, and Coordinator/Developer
> > LINCS Assessment Special Collection at
> > http://literacy.kent.edu/Midwest/assessment/
> >  
> > marie.cora@hotspurpartners.com
> >  
> >  
> >  
> > On Wed 10/5/2005, Nancy Hansen wrote:
> >  
> > I also have a question to those who test using
> > > computers:  Do you find the skills of the learner who has had next to 
> > > NO exposure to computers and LITTLE literacy skills are accurately 
> > > being portrayed via this style testing?
> > > 
> > > I have men and women in our adult literacy program who had never sat 
> > > down at a computer - much less used a mouse before.  I cannot imagine 
> > > that their extensive life skills would be evaluated appropriately when
> > 
> > > they hit and miss at the computer - sometimes even striking incorrect 
> > > keys.
> > > 
> > > Nancy Hansen
> > > Sioux Falls Area Literacy Council
> > > sfallsliteracy@yahoo.com
> > > 
> >  
> 



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