[Assessment 1109] Re: {Dangerous Content?} RE: No Questions or Comments?!

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Tina_Luffman at yc.edu Tina_Luffman at yc.edu
Tue Feb 5 13:32:14 EST 2008


Hi Jackie,

Thank you for this information. I believe this research must be what my
former Spanish teacher was basing her argument on for bilingual education
in the K-12 school system.

Tina

Tina Luffman
Coordinator, Developmental Education
Verde Valley Campus
928-634-6544
tina_luffman at yc.edu



"Jackie Coelho" <jackie.coelho at gmail.com>
Sent by: assessment-bounces at nifl.gov
02/05/2008 11:13 AM
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[Assessment 1108] Re: {Dangerous Content?} RE: No Questions or Comments?!






Hi Tina,

This has been researched already and is the basis for the arguement in
favor of bilingual education, a good idea that was not implemented in
the best way. For many years people have known that a good foundation
in literacy in the first language will facilitate learning in a second
or third language.

Another interesting twist is the existence of languages that are not
written.

Jackie


On 2/5/08, Tina_Luffman at yc.edu <Tina_Luffman at yc.edu> wrote:

> Hi list members,

>

> My experience teaching ELAA students in the GED class is similar to that

of

> Gail. If the student has a solid educational background in the country

they

> came from in their native language, they tend to advance rather quickly

and

> get their GED. Those coming with 6th grade educations from their country

or

> lower tend to stay in the GED class for years and do not make much

> advancement.

>

> This experience relates well to research done among Native American

tribes

> teaching them English. Those Native Americans who were first taught

literacy

> skills in their own tongue learned English much quicker than those who

tried

> to learn literacy skills in English without that background in their own

> tongue. I also found similar problems when I was learning Spanish. The

> concepts I could mentally translate from English to Spanish were much

easier

> to grasp and learn than those I didn't know in English. Perhaps this is

> something deserving more research.

>

> Tina

> Tina Luffman

> Coordinator, Developmental Education

> Verde Valley Campus

> 928-634-6544

> tina_luffman at yc.edu

>

> -----assessment-bounces at nifl.gov wrote: -----

>

> To: "The Assessment Discussion List" <assessment at nifl.gov>

> From: "Gail Burnett" <gburnett at sanford.org>

> Sent by: assessment-bounces at nifl.gov

> Date: 02/04/2008 06:34PM

> Subject: [Assessment 1104] {Dangerous Content?} RE: No Questions or

> Comments?!

>

>

> Warning: This message has had one or more attachments removed

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> Warning: Please read the "AttachmentWarning.txt" attachment(s) for more

> information.

>

> In our small adult education program, my experience (just about three

years)

> is that students with solid educational backgrounds advance,

particularly if

> they're not working too many hours. Those who advance the slowest, if at

> all, are immigrants who are barely literate in their first language. I

would

> say that lack of education is a bigger factor than lack of time; a

student

> who works full-time and is exhausted often will still succeed because

he/she

> is familiar with academic work, and is goal-oriented. What we do is try

to

> get our low-level students to come up with goals, but that's a hard

concept

> in a second language.

>

> This does not mean that the factors mentioned in the research don't play

a

> part, though. I'm one of those barely-trained teachers (transitioned

from

> another career, got trained mainly through workshops rather than

classes).

> My skill level very well may contribute to students' slow advancement.

It's

> hard for small adult education programs to get highly skilled ESL

teachers.

> The pay is low and there are no benefits. But my program is encouraging

me

> to get extra training and has me on a plan of improvement. I think we're

> making some progress.

>

> Does this address any of the issues? And am I submitting it right?

>

> ________________________________

>

> From: assessment-bounces at nifl.gov on behalf of Marie Cora

> Sent: Mon 2/4/2008 6:50 PM

> To: Assessment at nifl.gov

> Subject: [Assessment 1103] No Questions or Comments?!

>

>

> Hello everyone,

>

> I'm so surprised! No one has anything to comment on regarding your

> program's effectiveness at helping ESL students advance?? I was very

> curious to know if subscribers experience the same types of issues that

Dr.

> Chisman and Dr. Crandall found in their research: a lack of intensity

of

> instruction/few protocols for transitioning students/few opportunities

for

> professional development.

>

> What are the issues in your program that you feel inhibit the ESL

student

> from advancing? What do you try to do about that?

>

> Please post your questions and comments now.

>

> Thanks!

>

> Marie Cora

> Assessment Discussion List Moderator

>

>

> Marie Cora

> marie.cora at hotspurpartners.com

> <mailto:marie.cora at hotspurpartners.com>

> NIFL Assessment Discussion List Moderator

> http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/assessment

>

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