[ELA 5467] Re: repeated reading, vocab and concepts

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Mary Brunelle mbrunelle at yvcc.edu
Wed Feb 24 18:01:43 EST 2010


Hi Andrea and all,
Andrea, what a great point you have made! I absolutely agree with you: vocabulary and concepts must be linked, gone over and over, again and again. That is where previous Language Experience stories a class has created can be re-read as a review or warm-up activity in the first few minutes of a class. It is a slow process! This is even more important for low-level students, who have not completed even grade school!
Thanks for the insight from your colleague’s research!

Sincerely,
Mary Brunelle


From: englishlanguage-bounces at nifl.gov [mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at nifl.gov] On Behalf Of andreawilder at comcast.net
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2010 8:01 AM
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
Subject: [ELA 5446] Re: Phonics texts?

If the students benefit---that's what they are there for and you are doing the right thing.

One of my teachers is very clear in his writingand rreseaarch that when we learn something in a new domain, like reading, we have to go back to the beginning and work up from there. That's what you are doing, and doing well, it sounds like.

My learning: I am in the second semester of a course that requires new learning. I thought I new something about the topic, but I don't. I had to do what I always tell teachers: go back to the vocabulary, they link the concepts. The vocabulary has to be memorized, rehearsed or and over. It takes a long time of repeated effort and, frankly, repeated failure, until the learning sticks. It's hard. I have to overcome my own work avoidance strategies.

Andrea

----- Original Message -----
From: "Greg Boyd" <gregorboyd at gmail.com>
To: "The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List" <englishlanguage at nifl.gov>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2010 9:54:47 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [ELA 5443] Re: Phonics texts?

In my program we use the reading mastery DI (direct Instruction) series. It is a reading program that is meant for kids. When I first started using it I didn't like it. I had never taught pre-literate students before and I thought the pacing of the program was too slow at first. After I got to know the need of my class I found the text to be very useful.

Each lesson starts with phonics. The book has its own phonetic alphabet (long vowels have a line over them, the letters connect in blended sounds). After going over a few phonetic letters, there is a series of words using those sounds (in the words silents letters are smaller so that the students don't say them). It starts with simple one syllable words but as the lessons progress irregular and multi sylable words are introduced. After the students read the words there is a story that uses the words. All the writing in the story is written phonetically. The stories are short, in the begining they are only one sentence. Now I am on lesson 101 and the stories are about five or six sentences. The stories are kind of silly, but the repeat the target language several time and usually use rhyming words (Example, The story we read last night [" can kiss a cow. I can kiss a kitten. Can a cow kiss me? No. A cow can not kiss me. A cow can lick me.")

After the stories, the students usually complete a writing activity from a work book that came with the program, writing some of the words from the story. Each lesson takes about 45 minutes from start to finish.

As I said when I first started I really didn't like the series, but now I do. I am still not sure if I am using it exactly the way it is meant to but I think that the students benefit from it.

Does anybody else use this program? Your thoughts?

greg
On Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 10:10 AM, Salvatore Liotta <sliotta at gmail.com<mailto:sliotta at gmail.com>> wrote:

Thank you for the references.

I used Science Research Associates direct instruction phonics program.
Used properly it was very effective. Now I am looking into possible Wilson Reading training.

Sam
On Feb 22, 2010 8:31 PM, "Patsy Vinogradov" <patsyvino at yahoo.com<mailto:patsyvino at yahoo.com>> wrote:
Hello again,

I want to do three things here—


1. Highlight the terrific collection of resources and research done on teaching low-literacy adults that Jill Watson mentioned. That’s found at www.leslla.org<http://www.leslla.org>


2. Another list of literacy-level textbooks (if it hasn’t been mentioned yet) is the CAELA Resource Collection: Working with Literacy-Level Adult English Language Learners. www.cal.org/caela/esl_resources/collections/literacy.html<http://www.cal.org/caela/esl_resources/collections/literacy.html>


3. Several people have mentioned phonics texts, such as Sam and Pat (Heinle and Heinle). Another frequent choice is Talk of the Block (New Readers Press). How useful have you as teachers found such phonics-focused texts? Are there particularly pieces “missing” from these texts that you would like to see included? How’s the pace, content, etc. for our lowest level emergent readers?

Patsy Vinogradov
University of Minnesota
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