[ELA 6978] Re: Transitioning ELLs to College and/or Work

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Gretchen Bitterlin gbitterl at sdccd.edu
Fri Feb 4 19:43:25 EST 2011


I would recommend Ventures' Transitions, published by Cambridge University
Press.



http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/catalog/subject/project/custom/item5953510/Ve
ntures-Transitions/?site_locale=en_US





Gretchen Bitterlin

ESL Program Chair

ESL Resource Office

Mid City Campus

3792 Fairmount Ave.

San Diego, CA 92105

619-388-4514





From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Mary
Helldorfer-Cooney
Sent: Friday, February 04, 2011 6:36 AM
To: englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov; englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: [ELA 6957] Transitioning ELLs to College and/or Work



Hi everyone,



Thank you for all of the great tips regarding ELLs. I have a specific
question about what materials and/or texts you would suggest for adult ELLs
who are transitioning out of ESL (testing out on the CASAS exam at the
advanced level), but who still have gaps in their english skills when they
try to transition to work and/or college. Can you recommend any texts,
materials and/or activities for these students?



Thank you!



________________________________

From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov on behalf of
englishlanguage-request at lincs.ed.gov
Sent: Fri 2/4/2011 7:53 AM
To: englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: EnglishLanguage Digest, Vol 65, Issue 10

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of EnglishLanguage digest..."




Today's Topics:

1. [ELA 6941] Teaching Routine Language and using Classroom
Survival Phrases (Wrigley, Heide)
2. [ELA 6942] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
(Brenda Davis)
3. [ELA 6943] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
(Sue Jones)
4. [ELA 6944] Re: Creating health literacy pre and post-tests
(Carol Jones)
5. [ELA 6945] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
(Dawn Huffman)
6. [ELA 6946] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
(Holly Dilatush)
7. [ELA 6947] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
(Dawn Huffman)
8. [ELA 6948] Re: Welcome to Day 2 (Dawn Huffman)
9. [ELA 6949] Listening-speaking and technology - Live Mocha ?
(Wrigley, Heide)
10. [ELA 6950] Re: Academic word list (Bennett Katharine)
11. [ELA 6951] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
(Betsy L. Parrish)
12. [ELA 6952] Another Productive Day (Betsy L. Parrish)
13. [ELA 6953] Re: Creating health literacy pre and post-tests
(Dawn Huffman)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 12:15:11 -0500
From: "Wrigley, Heide" <heide at literacywork.com>
Subject: [ELA 6941] Teaching Routine Language and using Classroom
Survival Phrases
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<F260D870A5815F4EA043E300B68447F00F67E66647 at winxbeus18.exchange.xchg>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, Betsy and all
Thanks for highlighting the need for classroom routines and predictable
language for students new to Engish. A couple of additional ideas that have
worked for us
English Classroom Phrases from Day 1: In working with adult bilingual
classrooms (where teachers and students share the same language), I noticed
that teachers would always switch to L1 when giving basic classroom
directions (take out a piece of paper; write your name). We worked with them
to set up routines from day 1 where they would demonstrate what they wanted
students to do and use very basic English to accompany the action (and use L1
to preview and review the core ESL lesson). By using key phrases in English
and demonstrating their use also allows students to see that they can
understand some English from Day 1 (a big issue in bilingual classes where
there is often a great deal of translating or L1 use during the first week.
Signal Cards: We also worked toward having students use some of the key
phrases you mentioned. We created bit HELP cards so students kid signal if
they had problems with an individual or pair task (and be otherwise left
alone). We've also used SIGNAL CARDS (red, yellow, green) so that students
can signal when the teacher asks (do you understand? And 3 out of twenty say
a loud "yes" and the teacher moves on, unaware whether the quiet students are
with her.
Using Red, Yellow and Green Cards for Comprehension Checks. We use the same
cards for Comprehension Checks for listening comprehension or to check
factual knowledge. The teacher gives a statement (undocumented immigrants
don't have any rights in the US - True (hold up the green card), False (red)
or don't know (yellow). This strategy can also be used as a pre-post test
when the focus is on information to be learned (this can be connected to KWL
graphic organizers).
Classroom Survival Strategies: As part of other routine language, some of
the students in the same class, wrote up up "classroom survival phrases" such
as "I don't understand" "please slow down", "can I ask a question?" "please
repeat" and then taped the phrases on popsicle sticks so they could hold them
up during a lesson.
Best
Heide
PS: The weather here in St, Paul is actually better (though colder for
longer) than in New Mexico right now where we got hit with a nasty winter
snow storm and high winds and a mess on the highway)

From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Betsy L. Parrish
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2011 8:09 AM
To: englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: [ELA 6933] Setting up Routines + A Welcome to Day 4

Heide- Thanks for building on the discussion of class routines and technology
this morning. At a TESOL session a while back, Donna shared how she uses a
class checklist with these tasks and the teams for that week sign off on them
just as they would at work (I may not have that EXACTLY right, but you get
the idea). Another colleague here has students make the photocopies, coffee,
anything that represents skills they may use in a work setting.

Another idea, which prepares learners for work meetings, groups activities in
any academic setting, meetings at a child's school, is to teach students the
turn-taking phrases needed to stay engaged in a conversation:

"What do you think?"
"What about you?"
"I want to hear from..."

Phrases like these can be posted in the classroom along with the phrases we
typically post on the walls (What does ___ mean? Please repeat that? How do
you spell______?)

We have a number of threads started, so please continue with those and I will
be launching a new one specifically on strategies for developing listening
skills with beginners (which will also build on some of our conversations
about note-taking).

I hope Heide packed warm clothes!!

Betsy Parrish





I first heard about this from Donna Price in San Diego as a way to help
students make the link between school and work

Students sign up to serve on a team. There is the welcoming team that is in
charge of ,well, welcoming new students, introducing them to others I'm the
class, offering to eat lunch together, explaining how the class works
incuding rules for calling in and offering the inside scoop on the teacher.
There is a technology team (this one may have come fro Susan Gaer) where
members are in charge of making sure machines are turned on or off, checking
connections and in the modern classroom, locating the remote, checking the
LCD, and making sure the wireless works on the lap top the teacher may be
using - ditto with checking sound; the teacher may even give them the urls
she plans to be using to test during break
Sometimes these teams form naturally, when we had extended PBL project in
Socorro, it was clear that some students had a natural affinity for
technology , helping other students with their PPs and taking it upon
themselves to learn the video editing software so they could help making the
student produced videos look tight and professionals.
It makes sense to rotate the teams I think or at least introduce new members
into them (as apprentices perhaps) but the whole point is to offer
opportunities to run parts of the class as part of a team that has
responsibility and can make decisions based on good judgement (and judgement
calls of various kinds can be discussed with the entire class early on (back
to building critical thinking skills from the start)

Best

Heide

Heide Spruck Wrigley on my way to St.Paul
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Message: 2
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 12:04:49 -0600
From: Brenda Davis <davisbrenda49 at gmail.com>
Subject: [ELA 6942] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <A37F48D2-FBF4-4A9B-9716-06FC94D5D3DE at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

I have found that the ESL students really like it when I give dictation.
It's a challenge for some of them. They like to see if they know the words.
Of course I use words that they've studied. It is like writing a phone
message.
Brenda
On Feb 3, 2011, at 10:33 AM, Christine Powers wrote:


> In all of my teaching I try to connect what we are doing in class to real

> life and what is happening in the students' lives once they leave the

> classroom.

> Dictation, I remind them, is like taking a phone message - they may be

> asked to take a message for someone who is not home or at work and they

> will need the skill to be able to do that. Dictation then becomes real to

> the students and they look forward to it.

>

> When the students write stories or sentences in class I often use those

> for dictation as they are the students words. It is a good starting point.

>

> In a beginning class I would recommend dictation of the students' names.

> This way they learn each other's names and you are building a community

> within the class. You can also use the days of the week, months of the

> year and colors to get started.

>

> Christine

>

> Christine E. Powers, Supervisor

> Manchester Adult Learning Center

> 530 So. Porter Street

> Manchester, NH 03103

> 603.624.6490 x218

> FAX 603.628.6146

>

> ----------------------------------------------------

> The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

> EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov

> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

> Email delivered to davisbrenda49 at gmail.com




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 10:06:08 -0800 (PST)
From: Sue Jones <sejonz at yahoo.com>
Subject: [ELA 6943] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <579179.87950.qm at web65611.mail.ac4.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dictation is good; gapped texts, either with every 5th or 7th word removed,
or
key words removed are also helpful.

Sue Jones






________________________________
From: Diane Pecoraro <depecoraro at aol.com>
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Sent: Thu, February 3, 2011 8:53:57 AM
Subject: [ELA 6934] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills


Terry:
I support what you say about dictation.
Students like it and find it useful. At beginning levels, it challenges
learners
by testing many skills. I can picture how a teacher might expand it to
simple
notetaking and start the process early.

Diane Pecoraro

On Feb 2, 2011, at 10:30 PM, Terry Pruett-Said <said at ameritech.net> wrote:


Note-taking, especially at the college level, is indeed a very complex
process.
In fact, taking notes in your first language can be a challenge. As others
have
noted one aspect is knowing how to recognize what is important and to
organize
information, and people have given some very good suggestions. But another
challenge is the ability to write down what one hears. While dictation may
seem
a somewhat old-fashioned activity, I find most of my students appreciate the
opportunity to practice it to check their own ability to write what they hear
or
believe they are hearing. If the dictation is done in natural chunks as
opposed
to word by word, this presents a more natural speaking approach which will
sound
more like a college lecture. While dictation is not critical thinking, I do
think it is a skill that students can practice at beginning levels that
leads
into one aspect of effective note-taking.

>

>Terry Pruett-Said

>Macomb Community College

>

>

>

________________________________
From: Kimberly A. Johnson <kjohnson60 at gw.hamline.edu>

>To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

><englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>

>Sent: Wed, February 2, 2011 11:56:36 AM

>Subject: [ELA 6903] Organizing information and note-taking skills

>

>

>In our conversations on the listserv this week, the important skills of

>organizing information and taking notes have surfaced. What makes effective

>note-taking such a complex process?

>

>

>So...what does guided note-taking look like at beginning levels of

instruction?

>In the brief, Betsy and I share one idea: using a short reading on daily

>routines and then creating a grid that requires students to read for

specific

>information and transfer that onto the grid. This gets students engaged and

>interacting with the material and practices the skills of ordering and

>organizing information graphically.

> * How have you used guided notes and/or graphic organizers to

practice

>organizing information and note-taking?

> * What techniques and activities can you share that have worked with

beginning

>learners?

>Kim Johnson

>

>

>

>References

>Once more, you can access the CAELA Brief at

>http://www.cal.org/caelanetwork/resources/transitions.html

>

>

>Konrad, M. Joseph L., & Eveleigh, E. (2009). A meta-analytic review of

guided

>notes. Education and Treatment of Children 32(3), 421-444.

>

>Makany, T., Kemp, J. & Dror, I.E. (2009). Optimising the use of note-taking

as

>an external cognitive aid for increasing learning. British Journal of

>Educational Technology 40(4), 619-635.

>

>

----------------------------------------------------

>The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

>EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov

>To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

>http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

>Email delivered to depecoraro at aol.com




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Message: 4
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 13:24:07 -0500
From: "Carol Jones" <cjones at theliteracycenter-lv.org>
Subject: [ELA 6944] Re: Creating health literacy pre and post-tests
To: "'The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List'"
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <cfe1f3$qoa3ii at smtp01.lnh.mail.rcn.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, we're having the exact same problem. The standardized health literacy
measures (TOFHLA, REALM, Newest Vital Sign) were not developed for pre- and
post-test use, and we haven't found anything that it. We're also trying to
develop unit pre- and post- tests, but they, of course, are not standardized
and it's hard to find funding based on the results. We are starting a new
health literacy expanded program in the coming program year, and I've
considered using the TOFHLA for pre- and post-, just to see if students show
any gain..



I'd love suggestions, too.



_____

From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Andrew Trump
Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2011 6:44 PM
To: EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: [ELA 6925] Creating health literacy pre and post-tests



In our community-based adult ESOL program, we focus heavily on health
literacy, and are looking for ways to better measure learner knowledge and
progress. I know we're not the first to do this, yet I've had trouble
finding health assessments that can serve as pre and post-tests for ELLs.
We've had some success with the tests accompanying the Florida Literacy
Coalition's "Staying Healthy" curriculum
(http://www.floridaliteracy.org/literacy_resources__teacher_tutor__health_li
teracy.html) and I like parts of this assessment from the NIFL health
literacy curriculum
(http://healthliteracynetwork.org/materials/pdf/instr_guide/instr_8.pdf) but
both are written for such high-level readers and the NIFL test contains no
visual aids, just written questions. We've created our own tests for lower
levels, but I haven't been very happy with their quality.



Has anyone found/used/created good health assessments in adult ESOL classes?
Are there testing materials for beginning-level learners? We would love to
measure both knowledge and personal health attitudes and behaviors, without
reinventing the (seemingly very large) wheel. Thanks for any suggestions!



Andrew Trump

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Message: 5
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 12:42:01 -0600
From: Dawn Huffman <dkhuffman at mybentoak.com>
Subject: [ELA 6945] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<AANLkTinSF=sBoPMrT==C_OeOK5PHQCHcZv0o5Yb-9t6m at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello everyone,

Gapped text works very well at all levels. I often make these up, and some
of the books we have also have these exercises with songs. The book
*Pronunciation
Power* (I believe that's the name) has exercises with songs from musicals
and old folk songs that have text with some words left out. These are great
and fun to listen to as well. We also make up these types of exercises with
other songs, as long as the words are fairly easy to hear.

In addition, we also have a book with a tape that features many different
phone messages. The students listen to the messages and answer the questions
in the book. There are three tiers of questions, from simple and direct to
more complex and difficult. The students can take notes and answer the
questions. This only takes 5 or 10 minutes, so it's an easy way to address
listening, note-taking and discriminating information.

Dawn Huffman
On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 12:06 PM, Sue Jones <sejonz at yahoo.com> wrote:


> Dictation is good; gapped texts, either with every 5th or 7th word

> removed, or key words removed are also helpful.

>

> Sue Jones

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

> *From:* Diane Pecoraro <depecoraro at aol.com>

>

> *To:* The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List <

> englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>

> *Sent:* Thu, February 3, 2011 8:53:57 AM

> *Subject:* [ELA 6934] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills

>

> Terry:

> I support what you say about dictation.

> Students like it and find it useful. At beginning levels, it challenges

> learners by testing many skills. I can picture how a teacher might expand

> it to simple notetaking and start the process early.

>

> Diane Pecoraro

>

> On Feb 2, 2011, at 10:30 PM, Terry Pruett-Said <said at ameritech.net> wrote:

>

> Note-taking, especially at the college level, is indeed a very complex

> process. In fact, taking notes in your first language can be a challenge.

As

> others have noted one aspect is knowing how to recognize what is important

> and to organize information, and people have given some very good

> suggestions. But another challenge is the ability to write down what one

> hears. While dictation may seem a somewhat old-fashioned activity, I find

> most of my students appreciate the opportunity to practice it to check

their

> own ability to write what they hear or believe they are hearing. If the

> dictation is done in natural chunks as opposed to word by word, this

> presents a more natural speaking approach which will sound more like a

> college lecture. While dictation is not critical thinking, I do think it is

> a skill that students can practice at beginning levels that leads into one

> aspect of effective note-taking.

>

> Terry Pruett-Said

> Macomb Community College

>

> ------------------------------

> *From:* Kimberly A. Johnson <kjohnson60 at gw.hamline.edu>

> *To:* The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List <

> englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>

> *Sent:* Wed, February 2, 2011 11:56:36 AM

> *Subject:* [ELA 6903] Organizing information and note-taking skills

>

> In our conversations on the listserv this week, the important skills of

> organizing information and taking notes have surfaced. What makes

effective

> note-taking such a complex process?

>

>

> So...what does guided note-taking look like at beginning levels of

> instruction? In the brief, Betsy and I share one idea: using a short

> reading on daily routines and then creating a grid that requires students

to

> read for specific information and transfer that onto the grid. This gets

> students engaged and interacting with the material and practices the skills

> of ordering and organizing information graphically.

>

> - How have you used guided notes and/or graphic organizers to practice

> organizing information and note-taking?

> - What techniques and activities can you share that have worked with

> beginning learners?

>

> Kim Johnson

>

>

>

> References

> Once more, you can access the CAELA Brief at

> http://www.cal.org/caelanetwork/resources/transitions.html

>

> Konrad, M. Joseph L., & Eveleigh, E. (2009). A meta-analytic review of

> guided notes. *Education and Treatment of Children 32*(3), 421-444.

>

> Makany, T., Kemp, J. & Dror, I.E. (2009). *Optimising the use of

> note-taking as an external cognitive aid for increasing learning. British

> Journal of Educational Technology 40*(4), 619-635.

>

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------

> The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

> EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov

> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

> http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

> Email delivered to <depecoraro at aol.com>depecoraro at aol.com

>

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------

> The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

> EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov

> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

> http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

> Email delivered to dkhuffman at mybentoak.com

>

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Message: 6
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 13:45:32 -0500
From: Holly Dilatush <holly at dilatush.com>
Subject: [ELA 6946] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<AANLkTik4yB3xd5nDv9pis-rz5WnuYzY3gspcSFcNG_7M at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Adding to the ideas of note-taking skills building, dictation --

One of my favorite online classes (that I facilitate) are what I call
Transcription Classes. Each participant comes to the class (class held on
Skype) with one sentence ready to challenge the group with. I often, but
not always, model first by dictating a sentence. When it's "my" turn, I
speak the sentence two times, once in a naturally fast
native-speaker-with-a-comfortable-environment/audience voice, and a second
time a little (not a lot!) slower.

I refuse to repeat myself until each participant has typed something to show
what they heard (emphasis on what they heard, not what they *think* they
heard). Then I ask them to type what they think was said (the closest
meaning they could make of it).

Then I will repeat, and repeat, and repeat, slower and with more exaggerated
enunciation each time. I often start from the *last *word of the sentence
and then build the sentence by speaking 'thought chunks.'

Often I will then point out linking patterns, pronunciation and syllable
differences between contractions (I'm) vs. full words (I am), and so on.

Time is then given for questions -- on vocab meaning, on use, on form, on
pronunciation.

Then each participant is asked to repeat the same sentence aloud, two or
three times in succession.

Then we begin again with someone else's sentence.

Students may be asked to choose a sentence from assigned readings, sentences
specifically selected to practice a pronunciation challenge they
self-identify, to intentionally introduce new vocabulary, from a favorite
book they're reading, and so on.

I try hard to encourage one of the participants to post a recap to our site
(EnglishCafe.com).

http://www.englishcafe.com/groups/transcription-practice-and-related-pronunci
ation-practice-21723

[and here's a link to the discussion post parade there:
http://www.englishcafe.com/Transcription-Practice-21723/discussion]

If any of this appeals to you, I encourage you to review a few of the
discussion interchanges and student comments.

Asking /Assigning each student to record one sentence per week, and to post
at least one feedback comment weekly, and having a blog or Moodle or
EnglishCafe or other space to house those recordings and comments is an
exercise I highly recommend.

I'd be happy to answer questions about this if you contact me directly (
holly at dilatush.com) and you are welcome to join one of my classes on Skype
(as a participant and observer) anytime -- simply contact me on Skype [my
Skype ID = smilin7] and be sure to identify yourself as an adult educator
interested in visiting a Skype Transcription Class.

I'll be presenting this idea (and others relating to Skype) at TESOL New
Orleans in the Technology Village (CALL), Friday morning 9 a.m. March 18,
too.

Focused listening, in manageable, purposeful chunks, is something many
students report as being helpful. Documenting that pathway is a way to
reinforce progress, to target where specific interventions might be of
further help.
Holly
EnglishCafe.com Consultant and Facilitator
Charlottesville, VA, USA
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Message: 7
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 13:14:43 -0600
From: Dawn Huffman <dkhuffman at mybentoak.com>
Subject: [ELA 6947] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<AANLkTikyVGpudEVkoGZ77oDYDVvdrvjg6MB3ntvu4Qbj at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Holly,

Using Skype is a really interesting idea. Some of my students have this,
and some use other services. Do you use this as part of a free Adult
Education and Literacy ESL program, or more as a consultant type of program,
where students subscribe to the classes? The way you describe doing this is
also a wonderful way to teach students, and I've used similar methods in my
pronunciation/listening classes. I really love the idea of using Moodle or
Skype this way.

Dawn Huffman

On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 12:45 PM, Holly Dilatush <holly at dilatush.com> wrote:


> Adding to the ideas of note-taking skills building, dictation --

>

> One of my favorite online classes (that I facilitate) are what I call

> Transcription Classes. Each participant comes to the class (class held on

> Skype) with one sentence ready to challenge the group with. I often, but

> not always, model first by dictating a sentence. When it's "my" turn, I

> speak the sentence two times, once in a naturally fast

> native-speaker-with-a-comfortable-environment/audience voice, and a second

> time a little (not a lot!) slower.

>

> I refuse to repeat myself until each participant has typed something to

> show what they heard (emphasis on what they heard, not what they

*think*they heard). Then I ask them to type what they think was said (the
closest

> meaning they could make of it).

>

> Then I will repeat, and repeat, and repeat, slower and with more

> exaggerated enunciation each time. I often start from the *last *word of

> the sentence and then build the sentence by speaking 'thought chunks.'

>

> Often I will then point out linking patterns, pronunciation and syllable

> differences between contractions (I'm) vs. full words (I am), and so on.

>

> Time is then given for questions -- on vocab meaning, on use, on form, on

> pronunciation.

>

> Then each participant is asked to repeat the same sentence aloud, two or

> three times in succession.

>

> Then we begin again with someone else's sentence.

>

> Students may be asked to choose a sentence from assigned readings,

> sentences specifically selected to practice a pronunciation challenge they

> self-identify, to intentionally introduce new vocabulary, from a favorite

> book they're reading, and so on.

>

> I try hard to encourage one of the participants to post a recap to our site

> (EnglishCafe.com).

>

>

>

http://www.englishcafe.com/groups/transcription-practice-and-related-pronunci
ation-practice-21723

>

> [and here's a link to the discussion post parade there:

> http://www.englishcafe.com/Transcription-Practice-21723/discussion]

>

> If any of this appeals to you, I encourage you to review a few of the

> discussion interchanges and student comments.

>

> Asking /Assigning each student to record one sentence per week, and to post

> at least one feedback comment weekly, and having a blog or Moodle or

> EnglishCafe or other space to house those recordings and comments is an

> exercise I highly recommend.

>

> I'd be happy to answer questions about this if you contact me directly (

> holly at dilatush.com) and you are welcome to join one of my classes on Skype

> (as a participant and observer) anytime -- simply contact me on Skype [my

> Skype ID = smilin7] and be sure to identify yourself as an adult educator

> interested in visiting a Skype Transcription Class.

>

> I'll be presenting this idea (and others relating to Skype) at TESOL New

> Orleans in the Technology Village (CALL), Friday morning 9 a.m. March 18,

> too.

>

> Focused listening, in manageable, purposeful chunks, is something many

> students report as being helpful. Documenting that pathway is a way to

> reinforce progress, to target where specific interventions might be of

> further help.

> Holly

> EnglishCafe.com Consultant and Facilitator

> Charlottesville, VA, USA

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------

> The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

> EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov

> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

> http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

> Email delivered to dkhuffman at mybentoak.com

>

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Message: 8
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 13:24:00 -0600
From: Dawn Huffman <dkhuffman at mybentoak.com>
Subject: [ELA 6948] Re: Welcome to Day 2
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<AANLkTi=bSyd95wbSRTEA8Nn6emxZ86Xt0urutTpZW1+c at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello all,

Christine has a great idea with her half reading! I am going to try it. In
some of our classes there is a lot of emphasis on teaching Civics. For the
advanced students, I have taken great speeches from the past, such as MLK's
"I Have a Dream" or Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" and had my
students listen to someone read it and follow along. Then I have them read
it independently, or in pairs, and outline the speech, writing down only the
main ideas and important details. Later I have them try to reconstruct the
speech using their notes. We then talk about whether their notes captured
all the important points, and also what made the speech more or less
captivating than their rewritten speech. What literary tools did the speech
writers use? This could be done with simple stories for intermediate level
students as well.

Dawn Huffman


On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 8:51 AM, Christine Powers <cpowers at mansd.org> wrote:


> With all of the snow I am a bit behind on reading and posting but one

> thing I have used in beginning ESL classes (and higher) is what I call

> "half reading".

>

> I find a short story or article of interest based on the level of the

> class. I cover the right side os the article with a blank piece of paper

> and make a copy for each student.

>

> I ask them to read what they have in front of them and to talk about the

> article/story with a partner. We then list key vocabulary on the board

> that is essential to understanding the article/story. I then give each of

> them a full copy of the story and they are surprised to find out that they

> understood the main idea.

>

> I have found this a confidence builder as well as an aid to help them read

> the whole story/article through once without using a dictionary. I stress

> if they use a dictionary they will learn words, if they read they will get

> the idea and can then go back to work on the words.

>

> Try it - go back and cover the right side of a post to see if you get the

> jist if it and then read it fully!

>

> Christine E. Powers

> ESL Teacher/Coordinator

> Manchester Adult Learning Center

> 530 So. Porter Street

> Manchester, NH 03103

> 603.624.6490 x218

> FAX 603.628.6146

>

> ----------------------------------------------------

> The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List

> EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov

> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

> http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

> Email delivered to dkhuffman at mybentoak.com

>

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Message: 9
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 15:57:16 -0500
From: "Wrigley, Heide" <heide at literacywork.com>
Subject: [ELA 6949] Listening-speaking and technology - Live Mocha ?
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Cc: Eduardo Honold <ehonold at hcde-texas.org>, David J Rosen
<DJRosen at world.std.com>
Message-ID:
<F260D870A5815F4EA043E300B68447F00F67E6678C at winxbeus18.exchange.xchg>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Thanks, Holly

At one point, it would be great to explore the role of Skype in Language
Teaching and Learning - possibilities and limitations.
As long as we are talking about connecting Listening - Speaking and
technology, have any of you used Live Mocha with students or with as learners
yourselves?

If so, what has been your experience and what do you see as possibilities for
ESL learners (as part of or beyond the classroom) - And how can it connect to
Transition? Here's a description and review

http://l2mastery.com/featured-articles/review-of-livemocha-the-worlds-largest
-language-learning-community

Heide



From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Holly Dilatush
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2011 11:46 AM
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List
Subject: [ELA 6946] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills

Adding to the ideas of note-taking skills building, dictation --

One of my favorite online classes (that I facilitate) are what I call
Transcription Classes. Each participant comes to the class (class held on
Skype) with one sentence ready to challenge the group with. I often, but not
always, model first by dictating a sentence. When it's "my" turn, I speak
the sentence two times, once in a naturally fast
native-speaker-with-a-comfortable-environment/audience voice, and a second
time a little (not a lot!) slower.

I refuse to repeat myself until each participant has typed something to show
what they heard (emphasis on what they heard, not what they think they
heard). Then I ask them to type what they think was said (the closest meaning
they could make of it).

Then I will repeat, and repeat, and repeat, slower and with more exaggerated
enunciation each time. I often start from the last word of the sentence and
then build the sentence by speaking 'thought chunks.'

Often I will then point out linking patterns, pronunciation and syllable
differences between contractions (I'm) vs. full words (I am), and so on.

Time is then given for questions -- on vocab meaning, on use, on form, on
pronunciation.

Then each participant is asked to repeat the same sentence aloud, two or
three times in succession.

Then we begin again with someone else's sentence.

Students may be asked to choose a sentence from assigned readings, sentences
specifically selected to practice a pronunciation challenge they
self-identify, to intentionally introduce new vocabulary, from a favorite
book they're reading, and so on.

I try hard to encourage one of the participants to post a recap to our site
(EnglishCafe.com).

http://www.englishcafe.com/groups/transcription-practice-and-related-pronunci
ation-practice-21723

[and here's a link to the discussion post parade there:
http://www.englishcafe.com/Transcription-Practice-21723/discussion]

If any of this appeals to you, I encourage you to review a few of the
discussion interchanges and student comments.

Asking /Assigning each student to record one sentence per week, and to post
at least one feedback comment weekly, and having a blog or Moodle or
EnglishCafe or other space to house those recordings and comments is an
exercise I highly recommend.

I'd be happy to answer questions about this if you contact me directly
(holly at dilatush.com<mailto:holly at dilatush.com>) and you are welcome to join
one of my classes on Skype (as a participant and observer) anytime -- simply
contact me on Skype [my Skype ID = smilin7] and be sure to identify yourself
as an adult educator interested in visiting a Skype Transcription Class.

I'll be presenting this idea (and others relating to Skype) at TESOL New
Orleans in the Technology Village (CALL), Friday morning 9 a.m. March 18,
too.

Focused listening, in manageable, purposeful chunks, is something many
students report as being helpful. Documenting that pathway is a way to
reinforce progress, to target where specific interventions might be of
further help.
Holly
EnglishCafe.com Consultant and Facilitator
Charlottesville, VA, USA
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Message: 10
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 17:11:58 -0700
From: "Bennett Katharine" <Bennett_Katharine at stvrain.k12.co.us>
Subject: [ELA 6950] Re: Academic word list
To: "The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List"
<englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<E6C3FA71277D9D4CBD9165B293F22D9D163CDB10 at STVRAIN6.stvrain.k12.co.us>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I use TPR and LEA (Language Experience Approach) in my beginning Level 2
ESL class. I also use task-based listening in a variety of ways: Listen
and circle, Yes/No/IDK cards, listen and manipulate something (like
story strips, or furniture graphics on a picture of a blank room). All
three strategies are powerful memory builders.

I've had students at this level come to me after an LEA lesson and tell
me that it was the best class he or she had ever had. Them's powerful
words!



Kat Bradley-Bennett

Longmont, CO



From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Betsy L.
Parrish
Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 10:34 AM
To: englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: [ELA 6877] Re: Academic word list



Thanks, Alicia, for this idea for beginning-level learners. Hadn't seen
this before sending my welcome today, but this is just the sort of thing
we are hoping to bring to the discussion on what to do with beginners (I
agree that these techniques can be used for more "academic" language and
beyond beginning levels).



Betsy





What about using TPR (total physical response) to explain the word by
physically showing what it means (for lower levels) or for explaining a
concept (in higher levels)? TPR storytelling also helps put it in
context.



I find my learners remember words best (and are able to use them more)
when they have associated a movement (that we continue to repeat and
remember through the rest of our months working together) with each of
the new words they have learned.



The stories we create with the words that come up in class (or that I
designated target vocab in my lesson) are funny or sad (I exaggerate
either way so that they remember also bc it was sooo sad/happy) and are
about stories from my or my learners lives or at least set in places and
with characters we remember. We often use LEA to create these stories
and we plug in the new words in the story in the way it makes sense.



I think looking up words in bilingual or eventually english only
dictionaries, etc, is good but as something we might do AFTER we do TPR.
I find it less useful on it's own (though the practice of learning how
to / using a dictionary in general is useful to learn, of course)



Finally, real contexts where from the new words come from are a big part
of class. Newspapers, shopping coupons, at work, at childrens school,
etc. Stories, songs, poems, movies, radio pieces, bills, drama skits,
etc come in to class with specific vocab TPR helps us understand and
remember.



Do others here use TPR or LEA to explain, understand and practice new
words? How do you use it?



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Message: 11
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2011 15:27:19 -0600
From: "Betsy L. Parrish" <bparrish at gw.hamline.edu>
Subject: [ELA 6951] Re: Organizing information and note-taking skills
To: <englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <4D4AC896.FD09.00D9.0 at gw.hamline.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Kind of thinking this should go in the technology thread, but I am replying
to the messages below.

Dawn, here's another idea for using SKYPE that I observed. I visited Jessica
Jones at the MN Literacy Council when students were doing an info-gap
activity over SKYPE. Using one laptop per pair, students logged on with an
assigned account (she has created several for the site) and called another
pair of students in another room in the building. They had to find answers
to a series of questions. It was amazing the amount of authentic language
for clarifying, confirming information, lots of great practice spelling
things over SKYPE, that emerged beyond the target language needed for the
language task. By using SKYPE to do a classroom activity, students can become
more comfortable using it to call home, and it gets them on the computer in a
non-threatening way. For those with access to SKYPE, this is a very common
way (and free) to stay in touch with family.

Betsy Parrish


Holly,
Using Skype is a really interesting idea. Some of my students have this, and
some use other services. Do you use this as part of a free Adult Education
and Literacy ESL program, or more as a consultant type of program, where
students subscribe to the classes? The way you describe doing this is also a
wonderful way to teach students, and I've used similar methods in my
pronunciation/listening classes. I really love the idea of using Moodle or
Skype this way.
Dawn Huffman

On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 12:45 PM, Holly Dilatush <holly at dilatush.com> wrote:


Adding to the ideas of note-taking skills building, dictation --

One of my favorite online classes (that I facilitate) are what I call
Transcription Classes. Each participant comes to the class (class held on
Skype) with one sentence ready to challenge the group with. I often, but not
always, model first by dictating a sentence. When it's "my" turn, I speak the
sentence two times, once in a naturally fast
native-speaker-with-a-comfortable-environment/audience voice, and a second
time a little (not a lot!) slower.

I refuse to repeat myself until each participant has typed something to show
what they heard (emphasis on what they heard, not what they think they
heard). Then I ask them to type what they think was said (the closest meaning
they could make of it).

Then I will repeat, and repeat, and repeat, slower and with more exaggerated
enunciation each time. I often start from the last word of the sentence and
then build the sentence by speaking 'thought chunks.'

Often I will then point out linking patterns, pronunciation and syllable
differences between contractions (I'm) vs. full words (I am), and so on.

Time is then given for questions -- on vocab meaning, on use, on form, on
pronunciation.

Then each participant is asked to repeat the same sentence aloud, two or
three times in succession.

Then we begin again with someone else's sentence.

Students may be asked to choose a sentence from assigned readings, sentences
specifically selected to practice a pronunciation challenge they
self-identify, to intentionally introduce new vocabulary, from a favorite
book they're reading, and so on.


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Message: 12
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2011 16:48:46 -0600
From: "Betsy L. Parrish" <bparrish at gw.hamline.edu>
Subject: [ELA 6952] Another Productive Day
To: <englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <4D4ADBAC.FD09.00D9.0 at gw.hamline.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

So many more excellent ideas today on establishing classroom routines,
variations on dictation to get beginners started with note-taking, technology
integration, as well as the other topics we got started earlier in the week.
We have another day (and no doubt this will spill over to the weekend) to
explore these themes. Kim will get the discussion started tomorrow morning.

Hope those of you being hit by the storms this week are safe.

Betsy Parrish
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Message: 13
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 16:51:50 -0600
From: "Dawn Huffman" <dkhuffman at mybentoak.com>
Subject: [ELA 6953] Re: Creating health literacy pre and post-tests
To: <cjones at theliteracycenter-lv.org>, "'The Adult English Language
Acquisition Discussion List'" <englishlanguage at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <007401cbc3f4$f3015b20$d9041160$@mybentoak.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hello,



We also have health literacy as one of our goals, but I've had a hard time
finding a text that is advanced enough for my students. We have a couple of
texts that work well for beginner and intermediate students, but I often end
up going to the internet, newspaper and magazines for articles that will
challenge them and teach them new vocabulary. Likewise, we do not have a
good assessment for health literacy at the advanced level, so I often make
up tests on what we have read or studied. It seems to work OK, but of
course it's not standardized in any way. Any ideas would be appreciated.



Thanks,



Dawn Huffman







From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Carol Jones
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2011 12:24 PM
To: 'The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List'
Subject: [ELA 6944] Re: Creating health literacy pre and post-tests



Hi, we're having the exact same problem. The standardized health literacy
measures (TOFHLA, REALM, Newest Vital Sign) were not developed for pre- and
post-test use, and we haven't found anything that it. We're also trying to
develop unit pre- and post- tests, but they, of course, are not standardized
and it's hard to find funding based on the results. We are starting a new
health literacy expanded program in the coming program year, and I've
considered using the TOFHLA for pre- and post-, just to see if students show
any gain..



I'd love suggestions, too.



_____

From: englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:englishlanguage-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Andrew Trump
Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2011 6:44 PM
To: EnglishLanguage at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: [ELA 6925] Creating health literacy pre and post-tests



In our community-based adult ESOL program, we focus heavily on health
literacy, and are looking for ways to better measure learner knowledge and
progress. I know we're not the first to do this, yet I've had trouble
finding health assessments that can serve as pre and post-tests for ELLs.
We've had some success with the tests accompanying the Florida Literacy
Coalition's "Staying Healthy" curriculum
(http://www.floridaliteracy.org/literacy_resources__teacher_tutor__health_li
teracy.html) and I like parts of this assessment from the NIFL health
literacy curriculum
(http://healthliteracynetwork.org/materials/pdf/instr_guide/instr_8.pdf) but
both are written for such high-level readers and the NIFL test contains no
visual aids, just written questions. We've created our own tests for lower
levels, but I haven't been very happy with their quality.



Has anyone found/used/created good health assessments in adult ESOL classes?
Are there testing materials for beginning-level learners? We would love to
measure both knowledge and personal health attitudes and behaviors, without
reinventing the (seemingly very large) wheel. Thanks for any suggestions!



Andrew Trump

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