[Numeracy 308] Re: [ELA 5815] Re: Learners without educational experience or literacybut with basic numeracy

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Michael Gyori tesolmichael at yahoo.com
Wed Apr 14 11:57:33 EDT 2010


Hello everyone,

One of the beauties in presenting numbers to represent quantities of whatever (count nouns) is not only that it scaffolds onto what is known to learners whether literate or not, but also that it lends itself to teaching numeracy.

I'm also sending this message to the Numeracy List, as it pertains to the discussion on it about teaching numbers as representations so to speak of countable quantities rather than delving into, say,  integers (positive and negative numbers).  Negative quantities have no existence in concrete reality.  If I were familiar only with physically identifiable objects and how many there are of them - whether we add, subtract, multiply, or divide them - I would feel that inroads were being made both to my literacy and numeracy skills development. 

Then, we can begin linking the "concrete" with the "abstract" (such as graphs, bank balances, etc.) as we provide our students with the education they may never had had.

Michael

Michael A. Gyori
Maui International Language School
www.mauilanguage.com




________________________________
From: Val Yule <vyule at labyrinth.net.au>
To: The Adult English Language Acquisition Discussion List <englishlanguage at nifl.gov>
Sent: Tue, April 13, 2010 4:04:14 PM
Subject: [ELA 5815] Re: Learners without educational experience or literacybut with basic numeracy

Dominique's suggestion of beginning with numbers sounds brilliant.


How do you do it?
1 man  (and sketch)
1 house and 2 houses (and sketch of 2 houses)
1 car and 3 cars
1 tree and 4 trees
and so on?

Or do an ABC with it
1 ant
1 bat and ball 2 bats and balls 
3 cats
4 dogs or dollars
5 eggs
6 fishes
7 girls
8 houses
9 ice-creams
10 jumps
Then start at 1 again. But have the items ones that they know

Ideally we would teach reading at the same time as teaching oral English,
but there is too much business with the difficultes in spelling.

However, I always teach students their written names.  The whole class likes to have the names of everyone in the class, and the initial letters are important.

val yule



On 14/04/2010, at 10:01 AM, Dominique Brillanceau wrote:

Maria,

>Thank you for sharing your experience.  Your activity sounds very interesting for kinestetic learning and making learners feel successful. 

>But I was wondering if  we shouldn't begin with numbers first and use them as a bridge between  the non-literate and our literate world so students can begin with a known entity.

>Furthermore for people who have no English and no literacy skills, should we put literacy on the back burner until enough verbal skills have been acquired?  I know it isn't possbile in our program with 25 to 30 students in our beginning levels but what if we had a perfect world?

> 

>Dominique Brillanceau

>ESOL instructor

>Portland Community College

>Portland, Oregon

>----- Original Message -----

>>From: Maria Caratini-Prado

>>To: englishlanguage at nifl.gov

>>Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 3:01 PM

>>Subject: [ELA 5807] Re: Learners without educational experience or literacybut with basic numeracy

>>

>>

>>Here are my responses, Dominique:

>> 

>>My question to teachers of non literate adults: 

>>Do you use numbers as the common denominator when teaching non literate adults?  Does that precede sound letter correspondence and teaching of letters and basic sight words?

>> 

>>-I teach sound-letter correspondence before I teach numeracy.  I scatter the letters of the alphabet on a table. I have the students pick out the letters that correspond to their first name, middle name, and last name(s).  This is a fun way to learn who knows which letters, not embarrass anyone, and provides an enjoyable way of learning everyone's name.  I teach basic sight words in a similar way.  I like a kinesthetic approach to language learning with low literacy adult students.  (I'm the lady that brings in matchbox cars, so that we can take turns learning how to give directions.)  As my students evolve, we use TPR to create an environment in the classroom where we can demonstrate what we know how to do.

>> 

>>My question to program leaders/ directors:

>>What kind of curriculum is usually used with the nonliterate adults in your programs?

>> 

>>-We currently use a standards based textbook series:  Stand Out, Heinle Cengage.  The basic book is a very good book and the accompanying power point cd, video learning cd, and audio program is very good.  I have enjoyed teaching with that series.

>> 

>> 

>>

>> 

>>

>>

>>Maria Caratini Prado, M. Ed.

>>Program Director

>>ESL.ESOL.SLA

>>Arts, Languages and Literature Division

>>Eastfield College

>>3737 Motley Drive

>>Mesquite, Texas 75150

>> 972-860-7659  972-860-7659

>>mcaratini at dcccd.edu

>> 

>>Puede contestar en

>>español.

________________________________
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>>National Institute for Literacy

>>Adult English Language Acquisition mailing list

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>>To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go tohttp://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/englishlanguage

>>Email delivered to dbrillan at comcast.net----------------------------------------------------

>National Institute for Literacy

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>Email delivered to vyule at labyrinth.net.au





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