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[PovertyRaceWomen 390] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3, Issue 75

Muro, Andres

amuro5 at epcc.edu
Wed Jan 24 13:13:55 EST 2007


Andrea et al:

Dyslexia, Dysgraphia and Dyscalculia are various forms of aphasias.
Aphasias are related to damage of different areas of the cortex. This
affects the chemistry in a given area where the damage is.

However, medication for aphasias has not been that great. Instead,
assessment of type of aphasia can result in interventions that can help
people overcome difficulties. Combination of physical therapy with (in
some cases) medication can have the best results.

ADD, ADHD and other anxiety disorders are associated with brain
chemistry, but not necessarily with damage. Instead, presence or absence
of certain neurotransmitters can affect mood.

Aphasias are considered learning disabilities, but not mood disorders.

Andres


-----Original Message-----
From: povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov
[mailto:povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov] On Behalf Of Andrea Wilder
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 12:48 PM
To: The Poverty, Race,Women and Literacy Discussion List
Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 386] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,
Issue 75

Wait a minute--

Dyslexia does not seem to be related to brain chemistry, but to neural
circuits. There are medications for ADD and ADHD, I am sure there is
overmedication here, my sureness based on reports of general decrease
in these problems once school success happens--the reporters are Art
LaChance on another list and the head of learning disabilities and
testing at Lesley Unversity. Dysgraphia and dyscalculia I don't know
about, but I expect these are due to problems with neural circuits,
also.

I have personally observed children being put into the wrong teaching
groups, based on faulty testing. Ex: a Hispanic boy with little
English placed in an LD group. IEP's are often ridiculously phrased:
"Johnny will master 80% of spelling words on the weekly spelling tests
by April 1st." Also, you can't "cure' brain chemistry, but you can get
a better mix through some types of medication.

Because of the diagnostic practices in k-12 I suggest that when
possible (it rarely is, seemingly) adults be retested and rediagnosed.
Who mentioned over medication?

I wonder how the people who were famous felt about their mental
confusions? I wouldn't wish such suffering as we read about on anyone.
And who knows, maybe these talented people would have produced MORE if
they had had medical help?

I don't think we are talking silver bullet, but I may be wrong. The
difficulty in being marginalized is that you may be treated like dirt
by people in the center, like the African-Americans were who were
used for medical experiments. I've got the reference somewhere if
anyone needs it, if you do need some info quickly, google "Tuskegee
experiments."

Andrea




On Jan 23, 2007, at 11:24 AM, Burkett, Barry wrote:


> "The only (idiotic) solution is to test and diagnose VERY CAREFULLY

> those who seem to need it at the adult level."

>

> Not trying to ruffle feathers, but I think I am misunderstanding the

> quoted statement. If a child needs to be medicated for Dyslexia, ADD,

> ADHD, Dysgraphia and Dyscalculia than that person will also need to be

> medicated when an adult, because Dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, Dysgraphia and

> Dyscalculia are (from my understanding) related to brain chemistry...

> which cannot be "cured."

>

> I am curious as to whether this discussion of gender/racial

> marginalization is because we as people want a "silver bullet." Why

do

> we want people medicated to the norm? I am not saying that people

> should not be medicated, but why treat differences that have given us

> great inventors, artists and scholars?

>

> As educators we know that one cannot instruct all students in the same

> manner, is science now discovering the same is true when "curing"

them?

> Then, if science is learning the importance of individuality, is the

> American experiment of equality working where we are recognizing that

> people are different, even inside of gender and race, and that those

> differences are okay and important?

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov

> [mailto:povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov] On Behalf Of Andrea Wilder

> Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 8:26 PM

> To: The Poverty, Race,Women and Literacy Discussion List

> Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 383] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

> Issue 75

>

> The opportunities for misdiagnosis are legion, I've been there, know

> about it, have seen this in action in a very large city middle school.

>

> The only (idiotic) solution is to test and diagnose VERY CAREFULLY

> those who seem to need it at the adult level. Also, teachers should

> themselves know what to look for.

>

> Andrea

> On Jan 22, 2007, at 5:10 PM, Betsy Boggs wrote:

>

>> This is especially true for learning difficulties such as ADD/ADHD

and

>

>> dyslexia. Boys (especially boys of color) for years have been much

>> more likely to be diagnosed as having ADD/ADHD. And yet recent

>> research indicates that ADD/ADHD affects girls just as often,

however,

>

>> the symptoms often times look different than in boys. Because girls

>> don't usually have the same behavior issues, they frequently go

>> undiagnosed and therefore untreated and fail to receive any help. I

>> see many girls at the Community College that I know have some kind of

>> learning difference, but who report that they have never been tested

>> or diagnosed, and yet have struggled all through school. If they

>> weren't a behavior problem in the classroom, they were over looked.

>> Betsy

>>

>> -----Original Message-----

>> From: povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov

>> [mailto:povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov] On Behalf Of John Warrior

>> Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 4:28 PM

>> To: povertyracewomen at nifl.gov

>> Subject: Possible Spam:[PovertyRaceWomen 379] Re: PovertyRaceWomen

>> Digest, Vol 3, Issue 75

>>

>> Sadly, the problem extends beyond heart attacks. The world of

>> psychology has had to reevaluate how some disorders are categorized

as

>

>> being most often found in either males or females. Instead, it may be

>> that the prevalence of the disorder in the other gender is

>> under-reported, mostly due to misdiagnosis. This started when they

>> realized that men were suffering from eating disorders just like

>> women. So, anorexia and bulimia was no longer for women only. This

>> raised the question, well what about all of the disorders that we

feel

>

>> are common only in men. Some of these issues may be addressed when

the

>

>> APA publishes the DSM-V.

>>

>> So, we need to ensure that diagnostics are asexual and not

predisposed

>

>> for one gender or the other. Imagine being the man who develops

breast

>

>> cancer or the woman who has a heart attack and you or a loved one

dies

>

>> because of the misdiagnosis. Put your self in the position of someone

>> suffering from a mental disorder who goes undiagnosed because they

are

>

>> the wrong gender.

>>

>> John

>>

>>

>> -----Original Message-----

>> From: povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov

>> [mailto:povertyracewomen-bounces at nifl.gov] On Behalf Of

>> povertyracewomen-request at nifl.gov

>> Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 11:00 AM

>> To: povertyracewomen at nifl.gov

>> Subject: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3, Issue 75

>>

>> Send PovertyRaceWomen mailing list submissions to

>> povertyracewomen at nifl.gov

>>

>> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit

>> http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/povertyracewomen

>> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to

>> povertyracewomen-request at nifl.gov

>>

>> You can reach the person managing the list at

>> povertyracewomen-owner at nifl.gov

>>

>> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific

>> than "Re: Contents of PovertyRaceWomen digest..."

>>

>>

>> Today's Topics:

>>

>> 1. [PovertyRaceWomen 377] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

>> Issue 74 (Bertha Mo)

>>

>>

>>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

>>

>> Message: 1

>> Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 09:08:09 -0500 (EST)

>> From: Bertha Mo <bertiemo at yahoo.com>

>> Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 377] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

>> Issue 74

>> To: povertyracewomen at nifl.gov

>> Message-ID: <544122.16193.qm at web30006.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>>

>> Heart Attack Symptoms

>>

>> It's not just that heart attack symptoms in women are not recognized.

>> The

>> symptoms are ignored by people in the ER. A few years ago, Oprah had

>> three women on her show who all had heart attacks and were sent home

>> from the ER.

>> There are many studies about how depending on ethnic/race, gender,

>> class, people were differentially treated at ER, hospital, clinic.

>>

>> Oprah's very interesting intervention was to have Dr. Dean Ornish on

>> the program to talk about prevention.

>>

>> Best,

>>

>> Bertie Mo

>> povertyracewomen-request at nifl.gov wrote: Send PovertyRaceWomen

mailing

>

>> list submissions to povertyracewomen at nifl.gov

>>

>> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit

>> http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/povertyracewomen

>> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to

>> povertyracewomen-request at nifl.gov

>>

>> You can reach the person managing the list at

>> povertyracewomen-owner at nifl.gov

>>

>> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific

>> than "Re: Contents of PovertyRaceWomen digest..."

>>

>>

>> Today's Topics:

>>

>> 1. [PovertyRaceWomen 375] Recruiting and enrolling low-literate

>> adults (David Rosen)

>> 2. [PovertyRaceWomen 376] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

>> Issue 32 (reply to Andrea) (Andrea Wilder)

>>

>>

>>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

>>

>> Message: 1

>> Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 21:54:56 -0500

>> From: David Rosen

>> Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 375] Recruiting and enrolling low-literate

>

>> adults

>> To: Women and Literacy Discussion List The Poverty Race

>>

>>

>> Message-ID: <1FFAAD54-85DA-4B0F-B173-B1A8A11DF465 at comcast.net>

>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

>>

>> Poverty, Race and Women Discussion Colleagues,

>>

>> A colleague has asked me to speak to a group of adult literacy

>> education teachers about how to serve "hard-to-reach," low-literate

>> adults. I solicit your help in answering this question. I am

>> interested in hearing about your experience in "recruiting" or

>> enrolling "hard-to-reach" adults with low literacy skills. I am also

>> interested in hearing from adult learners, some of whom may be in

your

>

>> classes or may be people you tutor, some of whom may be colleagues on

>> this list. Perhaps you could share this question with teachers you

>> work with and post their responses or their learners' responses, or

>> they could reply directly on this list or to me by e-mail.

>>

>> Of course, "hard-to-reach" could mean many things. What does it mean

>> to you? And _serving_ hard-to-reach, low-literate adults might be an

>> important part of the answer to this question. For example, if one

of

>

>> the reasons adults with low literacy (or numeracy) skills don't step

>> forward for help is because they are hiding their reading writing or

>> numeracy disabilities or difficulties, then they will be reluctant to

>> come to classes in their community where others would find out.

>>

>> So, from your experience, who are "hard-to-reach" low-literate

>> adults, and what has been effective in recruiting and enrolling them?

>>

>> Thanks for your help.

>>

>> David J. Rosen

>> djrosen at comcast.net

>>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>> ------------------------------

>>

>> Message: 2

>> Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2007 08:39:20 -0500

>> From: Andrea Wilder

>> Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 376] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

>> Issue 32 (reply to Andrea)

>> To: "The Poverty, Race, Women and Literacy Discussion List"

>>

>>

>> Message-ID: <920bbef1578bd351effe738ff787c660 at comcast.net>

>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

>>

>> Kearney--

>>

>> No problem--turns out that (some) women have been misdiagnosed due to

>> different physical patterns/symptoms of heart attacks. Women's

>> symptoms are more diffuse. Quickness in decoding symptoms is related

>> to increases in life expectancy after heart attacks.

>>

>> Andrea

>>

>> Sorry my wording is so clumsy, I'm not quite going this morning.

>>

>> aw

>>

>> On Jan 21, 2007, at 6:49 PM, Kearney Lykins wrote:

>>

>>> Andrea,

>>>

>>> Concerning,? "male/female differences in heart attack symptoms."

What

>>

>>> about them?? Defining medical symptoms and such is part of

practicing

>>

>>> medicine. I think I am missing the nature of your question, and? how

>>> it relates to the topic of supposed gender bias in the sciences.

>>>

>>> ?Kearney

>>> ?

>>>

>>>

>>> ----- Original Message ----

>>> From: Andrea Wilder

>>> To: "The Poverty, Race, Women and Literacy Discussion List"

>>>

>>

>>> Sent: Saturday, January 20, 2007 1:47:38 PM

>>> Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 364] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

>>> Issue 32 (reply to Andres Muro)

>>>

>>> Kearney,

>>>

>>> What about male/female differences in heart attack symptoms???The

>>> female symptoms have only recently been described.??I don't know who

>>> "discovered" the difference, male or female.

>>>

>>> Social science is built on

1)????description??2)????prediction.??That

>>

>>> is,

>>> description in the aid of prediction. It is based on the discovery

of

>

>>> patterns in data.??Someone "observed/"discovered that women showed

>>> different symptom patterns.

>>>

>>> The same for Gilligan's work--she noticed that half the sample

showed

>

>>> different??patterns--women.??I'm only talking about observation,

>>> here, not prediction.

>>>

>>> If we are trying to find "truth," the 2+2 variety, then we must keep

>>> on--with the scientific method, which says really that "truth" may

be

>

>>> provisional, we have to keep conclusions open.??the scientific

method

>

>>> thus operates as a working principle.

>>>

>>> I have a favorite saying "Two Crows Denies??T his."??Google it.

>>>

>>> I think list servs??like this have great merit in that everybody is

>>> given space when just a few simple rules are followed.??So it is

>>> possible to say, Nope, I don't agree, and??here is why.??This is the

>>> Two??Crows response that??must be attended to if an accurate picture

>> is

>>> to be drawn.

>>>

>>> Depending on some characteristic, and it may be gender, different

>> facts

>>> may be spotted.

>>>

>>> Andrea

>>>

>>> On Jan 20, 2007, at 1:04 PM, Kearney Lykins wrote:

>>>

>>>> Concerning supposed gender bias in academia:

>>>>

>>>> ?

>>>>

>>>> I wrote: "None of my courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry,

>>>> biology, astronomy, and agronomy could be said to have had any

>>> gender-

>>>> or race-specific leanings.?The subject matter simply was not

>> amenable

>>>> to such predispositions."

>>>>

>>>> ?

>>>>

>>>> What I mean by that is that there is no such thing as a male or

>>> female

>>>> science. Sure, science is a social process that is ?constructed? by

>>>> flesh and blood participants, and historically those participants

>>> have

>>>> been overwhelmingly male. And we are beginning to understand, to

the

>

>>>> dismay of some scientists, that science is less objective than it

>> was

>>>> once perceived to be; that science has a rhetorical dimension. But

>>>> that doesn?t make the scientific method or its findings an

>> inherently

>>>> male product. It doesn?t change the shape of a galaxy or the

>>> molecular

>>>> weight of an atom. It doesn?t make 2 + 2 anything but 4.

>>>>

>>>> ?

>>>>

>>>> Regardless, to study the influence of female scientists vs male

>>>> scientists is not the domain of the pure sciences. It is the domain

>>

>>> of

>>>> sociology, or the philosophy of science, or the history of science,

>>>> the rhetoric of science etc? But I do think it is interesting to

>>>> ponder whether science would have turned out any differently had

>>> women

>>>> been more involved in its development, and whether the essential

>>> taste

>>>> of an apple pie is dependent upon the chromosomes of the baker.

>>>>

>>>>

>>>> Enjoying this discussion,

>>>>

>>>>

>>>> Kearney Lykins

>>>>

>>>>

>>>>

>>>>

>>>> ----- Original Message ----

>>>> From: Andrew Pleasant

>>>> To: "The Poverty, Race, Women and Literacy Discussion List"

>>>>

>>

>>>> Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2007 11:29:09 PM

>>>> Subject: [PovertyRaceWomen 336] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3,

>>>> Issue 32 (reply to Andres Muro)

>>>>

>>>> Hi,

>>>>

>>>> Writing in response to the commonly encountered suggestion:??"None

>> of

>>>> my courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy,

>>> and

>>>> agronomy could be said to have had any gender- or race-specific

>>>> leanings.??The subject matter simply was not amenable to such

>>>> predispositions."

>>>>

>>>> I have not seen the reading lists for these courses. I wonder if

>> they

>>>> included writings by women like Rachel Carson, Sophia Brahe,

>> Rosalind

>>>> Franklin, Jane Colden, Jane Lubchenco, Barbara McClintock, Marie

>>>> Curie, or Sofia Kovalevskia? I hope so, but I admit I am skeptical.

>>>>

>>>> We cannot know for certain that the western and now dominant idea

of

>

>>>> 'what science is' would differ if it were more inclusive. That is

an

>

>>>> experiment we cannot run.

>>>>

>>>> We do know with certainty that only white men were allowed in

Robert

>

>>>> Boyle's community of peers. These men were empowered to validate

>>>> science by witnessing the experimental method in action. They

>>>> established the model for what we now call science. I'll bet Boyle

>>> was

>>>> included in the course readings, but was Hobbes (who disagreed with

>>>> Boyle and many suggest was actually correct)?

>>>>

>>>> We also know for certain that many female and deserving scientists

>>>> were and are not equally supported by the scientific community as

>>>> compared to their male counterparts (overall). This continues

today.

>>>> Look at Ph.D. rates in the sciences in U.S. universities, the data

>>>> underpinning the U.S. National Institute of Health's need to create

>>>> efforts to ensure that women and minorities are included in all

>> human

>>>> subject research, recent comments from the now ex-president of

>>> Harvard

>>>> University and resulting controversy, Rosalind Franklin, the

>>> responses

>>>> to Rachel Carson within and from outside of the scientific

>> community,

>>>> etc.

>>>>

>>>> We may also be able to dig further into the notion that "The

subject

>

>>>> matter simply was not amenable to such predispositions." That is a

>>> bit

>>>> vague. I'd ask, is this statement grounded in a view that science

is

>

>>>> an unbiased route to truth? (E.g., Karl Popper, logical

>> rationalists)

>>>>

>>>> If so, there is a large, peer-reviewed, and active research field

>>> that

>>>> seems to have quite convincingly demonstrated that science is a

>>> social

>>>> process. A social process inherently includes human self-interests,

>>>> personal leanings and curiosities, social disputes, power

relations,

>

>>>> biases,??and a host of other influences. While no one can exactly

>>>> demonstrate how science would be different through broader

>> inclusion,

>>>> there is sound evidence that science is the result of who was and

is

>

>>>> working within science as well as who controls the funding for

>>>> science.

>>>>

>>>> This does not necessarily weaken the validity of science (a

>> different

>>>> issue altogether), but there is very strong evidence that science

is

>

>>>> definitely "amenable to such predispositions".

>>>>

>>>> fwiw as always, (and apologies for not having the time to write a

>>>> shorter, more readable reply)

>>>>

>>>> Andrew

>>>> ----------------------------------------------------

>>>> National Institute for Literacy

>>>> Poverty, Race, Women and Literacy mailing list

>>>> PovertyRaceWomen at nifl.gov To unsubscribe or change your

subscription

>

>>>> settings, please go to

>>>> http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/povertyracewomen

>>>>

>>>>

>>>> No need to miss a message. Get email on-the-go with Yahoo! Mail for

>>>> Mobile. Get

>>>> started.----------------------------------------------------

>>>> National Institute for Literacy

>>>> Poverty, Race, Women and Literacy mailing list

>>>> PovertyRaceWomen at nifl.gov To unsubscribe or change your

subscription

>

>>>> settings, please go to

>>>> http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/povertyracewomen

>>> Kearney,

>>>

>>>

>>> What about male/female differences in heart attack symptoms???The

>>> female symptoms have only recently been described.??I don't know who

>>> "discovered" the difference, male or female.

>>>

>>>

>>> Social science is built on

1)????description??2)????prediction.??That

>>

>>> is,

>>> description in the aid of prediction. It is based on the discovery

of

>

>>> patterns in data.??Someone "observed/"discovered that women showed

>>> different symptom patterns.

>>>

>>>

>>> The same for Gilligan's work--she noticed that half the sample

showed

>

>>> different??patterns--women.??I'm only talking about observation,

>>> here, not prediction.

>>>

>>>

>>> If we are trying to find "truth," the 2+2 variety, then we must keep

>>> on--with the scientific method, which says really that "truth" may

be

>

>>> provisional, we have to keep conclusions open.??the scientific

method

>

>>> thus operates as a working principle.

>>>

>>>

>>> I have a favorite saying "Two Crows Denies??T his."??Google it.??

>>>

>>>

>>> I think list servs??like this have great merit in that everybody is

>>> given space when just a few simple rules are followed.??So it is

>>> possible to say, Nope, I don't agree, and??here is why.??This is the

>>> Two??Crows response that??must be attended to if an accurate picture

>>> is to be drawn.??

>>>

>>>

>>> Depending on some characteristic, and it may be gender, different

>>> facts may be spotted.

>>>

>>>

>>> Andrea

>>>

>>>

>>> On Jan 20, 2007, at 1:04 PM, Kearney Lykins wrote:

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> ArialConcerning

>>> supposed gender bias in academia:

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Arial?> fontfamily>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> ArialI wrote: "None of my

>>> courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, and

>>> agronomy could be said to have had any gender- or race-specific

>>> leanings.?The subject matter simply was not amenable to such

>>> predispositions."

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Arial?> fontfamily>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> ArialWhat I mean by that is

>>> that there is no such thing as a male or female science. Sure,

>>> science is a social process that is ?constructed? by flesh and blood

>>> participants, and historically those participants have been

>>> overwhelmingly male. And we are beginning to understand, to the

>>> dismay of some scientists, that science is less objective than it

was

>

>>> once perceived to be; that science has a rhetorical dimension. But

>>> that doesn?t make the scientific method or its findings an

inherently

>

>>> male product. It doesn?t change the shape of a galaxy or the

>>> molecular weight of an atom. It doesn?t make 2 + 2 anything but 4.

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Arial?> fontfamily>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> ArialRegardless, to study the

>>> influence of female scientists vs male scientists is not the domain

>>> of the pure sciences. It is the domain of sociology, or the

>>> philosophy of science, or the history of science, the rhetoric of

>>> science etc? But I do think it is interesting to ponder whether

>>> science would have turned out any differently had women been more

>>> involved in its development, and whether the essential taste of an

>>> apple pie is dependent upon the chromosomes of the baker.

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> ArialEnjoying this

>>> discussion,

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> ArialKearney

>>> Lykins

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Roman-----

>>> Original Message ----

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanFrom: Andrew

>>> Pleasant <

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanTo: "The

>>> Poverty, Race, Women and Literacy Discussion List"

>>> <

>>

>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanSent:

>>> Wednesday, January 17, 2007 11:29:09 PM

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanSubject:

>>> [PovertyRaceWomen 336] Re: PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3, Issue 32

>>> (reply to Andres Muro)

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New

>>> RomanHi,

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanWriting in

>>> response to the commonly encountered suggestion:??"None of

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanmy courses

>>> in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy,

>>> and

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanagronomy

>>> could be said to have had any gender- or

>>> race-specific

>>>

>>>

>> Times New

>>> Romanleanings.??The

>>> subject matter simply was not amenable to

>>> such

>>>

>>>

>> Times New

>>> Romanpredispositions."> fontfamily>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanI have not

>>> seen the reading lists for these courses. I wonder if

>>> they

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanincluded

>>> writings by women like Rachel Carson, Sophia Brahe,

>>> Rosalind

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanFranklin,

>>> Jane Colden, Jane Lubchenco, Barbara McClintock,

>>> Marie

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanCurie, or

>>> Sofia Kovalevskia? I hope so, but I admit I am

>>> skeptical.

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanWe cannot

>>> know for certain that the western and now dominant idea

>>> of

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Roman'what

>>> science is' would differ if it were more inclusive. That is

>>> an

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanexperiment

>>> we cannot run.

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanWe do know

>>> with certainty that only white men were allowed in

>>> Robert

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanBoyle's

>>> community of peers. These men were empowered to

>>> validate

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanscience by

>>> witnessing the experimental method in action.

>>> They

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanestablished

>>> the model for what we now call science. I'll bet Boyle

>>> was

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanincluded in

>>> the course readings, but was Hobbes (who disagreed

>>> with

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanBoyle and

>>> many suggest was actually correct)?

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanWe also know

>>> for certain that many female and deserving

>>> scientists

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanwere and are

>>> not equally supported by the scientific community

>>> as

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romancompared to

>>> their male counterparts (overall). This continues

>>> today.

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanLook at

>>> Ph.D. rates in the sciences in U.S. universities, the

>>> data

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanunderpinning

>>> the U.S. National Institute of Health's need to

>>> create

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanefforts to

>>> ensure that women and minorities are included in all

>>> human

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romansubject

>>> research, recent comments from the now ex-president of

>>> Harvard

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanUniversity

>>> and resulting controversy, Rosalind Franklin, the

>>> responses

>>>

>>>

>> Times New Romanto Rachel

>>> Carson within and from outside of the scientific

>>> community,

>>>

>>>

>> Times New

>>> Romanetc.

>>>

>>>

>>>

>> Times New RomanWe may also

>>

>> === message truncated ===

>>

>>

>>

>>

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>> End of PovertyRaceWomen Digest, Vol 3, Issue 75

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>

> ----------------------------------------------------

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> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

> http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/povertyracewomen

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