[PD 5727] Re: ProfessionalDevelopment Digest, Vol 69, Issue 43

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Anurag Sagar sagar at centerforliteracy.org
Fri Jun 24 16:06:32 EDT 2011


Hello,

I am very intrigued by Patricia Bennett's comments regarding the efforts
of OVAE to improve the quality and effectiveness of adult literacy
practioners.
I have been involved in the field of adult literacy for almost 15 years
both as a GED instructor and currently as ESL teacher and program
manager. Interestingly enough, although I have no "formal" teaching
credentials (my background is in science), I was invited to give an
address at the OVAE Symposium on Adult Teacher Quality and Effectiveness
Symposium in DC last September.

I am pleased that some of my comments shared at the Symposium,
especially regarding teacher compensation (which as we all acknowledge
is rather pathetic in this field) and creating partnerships between
schools of education and literacy organizations (almost non existent in
Philadelphia), are being considered seriously.

The reality though is grim. This year, our adult literacy teachers (all
of whom are part time) will have less paid prep time than in the past!
At our agency staff is encouraged to work fulltime, but unfortunately
with inadequate salaries, and having to commute from site to site to
teach 4 classes (a full time workload) most choose to work part time. It
is not easy to ask these teachers to put in the many extra hours
required for PD without some understanding that this will lead not just
to greater personal satisfaction, but also to a "promotion" in their
chosen field.


-Anurag Sagar PhD

ESL Program Manager
Center for Literacy
Philadelphia, PA 19106
215-474-1235 ext 222
sagar at centerforliteracy.org


-----Original Message-----
From: professionaldevelopment-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[mailto:professionaldevelopment-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of
professionaldevelopment-request at lincs.ed.gov
Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 10:36 AM
To: professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov
Subject: ProfessionalDevelopment Digest, Vol 69, Issue 43

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of ProfessionalDevelopment digest..."




Today's Topics:

1. [PD 5702] Re: Shifting the Nature of the Adult Education
Workforce (Bennett, Patricia)
2. [PD 5703] Day Four Summary: Incentives (Jackie A. Taylor)
3. [PD 5704] Re: Evidence about the value of Certification
(Andy Nash)
4. [PD 5705] Day Five: What's Needed for Policy and Practice
(Jackie A. Taylor)
5. [PD 5706] PD for experienced teachers on the road to
credentialing (Miriam Burt)
6. [PD 5707] Re: from Stephanie, Need for Math Specialists in AE
(Virginia Simmons)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 07:47:03 -0500
From: "Bennett, Patricia" <Patricia.Bennett at ed.gov>
Subject: [PD 5702] Re: Shifting the Nature of the Adult Education
Workforce
To: "jackie at jataylor.net" <jackie at jataylor.net>, The Adult Literacy
Professional Development Discussion List
<professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<F5FEB3B8FC766745A28A2E3ED593C834A7E11E347E at EDUPTCEXMB02.ed.gov>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252"


First, let me introduce myself. I?m an Education Specialist on the
national projects team at OVAE. My portfolio of projects at OVAE
includes teacher quality and effectiveness and the Learning to Achieve
initiative to improve outcomes for students with learning disabilities.
Prior to coming to OVAE, I was at the National Institute for Literacy
(NIFL) and the State Director for Adult Education in Maryland.

The discussion this week has been really interesting and is very
connected to OVAE?s longstanding commitment to Teacher Quality and
Effectiveness, and particularly to teacher qualifications and
credentials. I want to share some information about OVAEs recent and
planned activities that may be of interest. OVAE?s Teacher Quality
projects include CAELA, CAELA Network, Standards, STAR, and TEAL. OVAE
also convened a Symposium on Adult Education and Teacher Effectiveness
in September and led a Teacher Quality strand at the Annual State
Directors Meeting in May. Many of the comments this week are very
pertinent to the work of this new project.
OVAE recently posted a request for proposals to begin a three year
project to Promote Teacher Effectiveness in Adult Education. The goal is
to improve instructional services and outcomes for adult learners. The
project will create model teacher competencies, a Toolkit to assists
states in implementing the competencies and a model teacher induction
program. OVAE will also validate and field test the model competencies,
Toolkit, and induction program with several states. The project will be
announced in OVAE Connections when the contract is awarded.

Additionally, in WIA reauthorization, Brenda Dann-Messier continues to
articulate the Administration proposal to ?Ensure that all adult
learners benefit from highly effective instructors and education
leaders, by professionalizing the field of adult education?. This would:
? Set a minimum teacher requirement of bachelor?s degree;
? Compensate teachers for planning time;
? Develop partnerships with universities to develop and strengthen
teacher training programs, specifically geared toward teaching literacy
and basic skills to adults;
? Support professional development systems that recognize the
increasing demands for innovation, and prepare teachers to develop
skill-sets needed for innovative models, such as career pathways and
strategies for accelerated learning based on research and effective
practice.

OVAE also continues to support the LINCS projects which include a LINCS
Collection of evidence-based resources, and regional Professional
Development Centers. LINCS projects are designed to fill a need for
ongoing professional development and dissemination of high-quality
resources to the field.

I look forward to hearing more engaging discussion today.

Patricia Bennett
________________________________________
From: professionaldevelopment-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[professionaldevelopment-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] On Behalf Of Jackie A.
Taylor [jackie at jataylor.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 2:12 PM
To: 'The Adult Literacy Professional Development Discussion List'
Subject: [PD 5686] Shifting the Nature of the Adult Education Workforce

Dear PD List Members:

Many of us may be able to describe (in our sleep!) the issues created in
our field by having a significant portion of our workforce as part time.
(82% PT, last I heard Assistant Secretary Brenda Dann-Messier speak).
The teachers themselves are hard working and dedicated to professional
learning, as Bob Hughes is noting in his message on incentives. But I am
referring to the structural nature of the workforce itself as mostly
part time.

If we build certification and credentialing systems to improve teacher
quality, the part time workforce in particular most often lack the
reasons to participate beyond dedication, personal satisfaction or other
examples raised in this discussion thus far. These reasons are the ones
that help to keep educators who have honed knowledge and skills in the
adult education field. There seem to be few career ladders, advancement
in pay, and other anticipated opportunities that one would find in other
fields.

I?m wondering who, at the local, state, and national levels, is working
to solve this issue. How do we solve the problems for certification and
credentialing created by a part-time workforce? What needs to happen
going forward?

Second, has anyone shifted their program, or programs within their
state, to more full-time staff with benefits, established some sort of
career ladder that advances teachers within the adult education teaching
profession? If so, please tell us about it and whether you?ve seen
improvements in student outcomes as a result.


PS -- If you know of someone who could contribute to this thread but who
may not be subscribed to the PD List, I hope you?ll invite them to
participate.

To subscribe:
http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/Professionaldevelopment/

Jackie



Jackie Taylor
Professional Development List Facilitator
LINCS: http://lincs.ed.gov/
AALPD: http://www.aalpd.org/

865.680.7668
Jackie at jataylor.net<mailto:Jackie at jataylor.net>


Connect with PD List Members!


To post to the PD List, email:
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s.ed.gov>
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------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 09:48:03 -0400
From: "Jackie A. Taylor" <jackie at jataylor.net>
Subject: [PD 5703] Day Four Summary: Incentives
To: "'The Adult Literacy Professional Development Discussion List'"
<professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <C1635A46D4DB49AEA0D686B969B78668 at dell2>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear PD List Colleagues:



On Thursday, we discussed what incentives are available and what could
or
should be made available to those who would like to pursue certification
or
credentialing in adult education:



"What incentives are currently in place that effectively incentivize
certification or credentialing in your area? What supports are needed to
make a certification and credentialing process work in adult education?
What
are some solutions for putting incentives in place?"

Ideas offered were for employers to help defray the cost of classes or
offer
scholarships for some of the required coursework. Nancy Sheridan shared
an
update on Rhode Island's work. She suggested:

"It seems to me that investing in the professional development center to
deliver free or perhaps low cost programming to practitioners, enabling
them
to possibly secure a credential makes sense."

Would requiring a credential or degree shift the nature of the field in
terms of who teaches? Rachel Baron offered:

"In my experience, though, there aren't very many college students out
there
who are just dying to get into the field of adult education. I fell into
this through a series of "happy accidents," and I think that is a pretty
common story. If a credential or degree in Adult Education is required
to
get a job in the first place, my guess is that programs in most states
will
need to recruit a different group of people from those who are currently
teaching. I'm not sure if that's good or bad."

We discussed more chicken and the egg issues, such as placing adult
education side by side with Elementary, Secondary, or Special Education
as
an educational track option. That would be reasonable if there were
full-time job options for graduates to pursue.

Bob Hughes pointed out that ABE/ESOL teachers are the most dedicated to
their own professional learning and need the least incentives to
participate
in professional development opportunities. However, we need options to
help
them enter and stay in the field so we can retain these dedicated,
knowledgeable and skilled educators. He offers these suggestions:

1. Employers need to recognize the added value to their
organization by
having hiring guidelines which place value on levels of certification.

2. Employers need to recognize the levels of certification through
their pay structures, with incentives such as bonus payments for
advanced
certification, and salary schedules that reward certifications.

3. Employers need to develop organizational professional
development
plans that include partial or full support for advanced training that
leads
to certification. While some employers do pay for employees' classes, a
more
strategic plan is to provide reimbursements and support for
certification
courses that are built around clear standards and outcomes.

4. As practitioners, policy advocates, and researchers,
certification
is an incentive for us. It helps us push for systems that acknowledge
the
incredible resource that ABE/TESOL instructors are within adult
education.
We can use certification processes to remind policy makers and managers
of
our skills and knowledge and the impact that this provides on our
communities.

We have since been discussing what it would take to shift the nature of
the
adult education workforce to a more full time status with benefits. This
seems to be the crux of the chicken and egg issue to professionalize the
field. Karen Mundie, Paulette Church and others are sharing examples
where
programs have done this successfully and have improved student outcomes
as a
result. See the thread on Shifting the Nature of the Workforce to
contribute
to this discussion topic.

I am still updating the wiki but check back here for the threads
discussed-to-date:



http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Teacher_Certification_and_Credent
iali
ng_in_Adult_Education



Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS: <http://lincs.ed.gov/> http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD: http://www.aalpd.org/



865.680.7668

Jackie at jataylor.net






Connect with PD List Members!



To post to the PD List, email:

professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov

To subscribe, unsubscribe or set subscription options:

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Message: 3
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 09:48:21 -0400
From: "Andy Nash" <andy_nash at worlded.org>
Subject: [PD 5704] Re: Evidence about the value of Certification
To: "'The Adult Literacy Professional Development Discussion List'"
<professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <4E045D63.46A4.00DA.1 at worlded.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

I think demonstration lessons are powerful elements of a hiring process.
I'm less interested in teachers carrying out a specific technique,
however, and more in observing their ability to creatively select the
techniques most effective for the class and objectives in front of them.
In hiring, I think it's also helpful to know whether the candidate has
ever learned (or tried to learn) a language before, or ever had to
adjust to another culture.

Andy Nash
World Education


>>> "Forrest Chisman" <forrest at crosslink.net> 6/23/2011 8:37 PM >>>


Gretchen,

Thank you so much for this. For some time I?ve thought that if we knew
what criteria really good programs use for hiring teachers we would have
an important insight into what form criteria for certification both
should and CAN take. But I?ve never had a chance to ask anyone. Do
others in this discussion share my interest in this topic? If so, do
others have hiring strategies they can share with us?

Forrest

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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 10:30:04 -0400
From: "Jackie A. Taylor" <jackie at jataylor.net>
Subject: [PD 5705] Day Five: What's Needed for Policy and Practice
To: "'The Adult Literacy Professional Development Discussion List'"
<professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <14DA7BB6722B4D369296B3A3C9CDD295 at dell2>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear PD List Colleagues:



This has been an amazing discussion. Thank you all for your time and
thoughtful consideration. Today is the last "official" day though you
should
feel free to discuss any threads put forth now and after the discussion
officially ends. We have some inquiries out for others not on the PD
List to
contribute, so anticipate that we may hear from one or more individuals
early next week.



Consider all of the thinking we have done together on certification and
credentialing, including factors that contribute to the nature of the
adult
education workforce and what we've learned from research.



What are the implications for policy and practice at the local, state,
and
national levels to make a certification and credentialing system work?
What
needs to happen to make key changes in our field that will
professionalize
the workforce?



For example, consider policy or practice recommendations for:



* Practitioners
* Employers / Program administrators
* Professional development systems
* Colleges, universities
* States
* State and national professional associations
* Research
* Others not listed above but who may be key players



Let's brainstorm today and I'll compile a list for sharing. Please keep
it
within discussion list guidelines
<http://lincs.ed.gov/lincs/discussions/list_guidelines.html> . Below is
Bob's list if you'd like some ideas to get started.



Looking forward.Jackie



Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS: <http://lincs.ed.gov/> http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD: http://www.aalpd.org/



865.680.7668

Jackie at jataylor.net






Connect with PD List Members!



To post to the PD List, email:

professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov

To subscribe, unsubscribe or set subscription options:

http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/Professionaldevelopment/

Follow Us on Twitter @TechPD <http://twitter.com/TechPD>



<http://twitter.com/TechPD>





Recommendations offered thus far:



* Employers need to recognize the added value to their
organization by
having hiring guidelines which place value on levels of certification.



* Employers need to recognize the levels of certification through
their pay structures, with incentives such as bonus payments for
advanced
certification, and salary schedules that reward certifications.



* Employers need to develop organizational professional
development
plans that include partial or full support for advanced training that
leads
to certification. While some employers do pay for employees' classes, a
more
strategic plan is to provide reimbursements and support for
certification
courses that are built around clear standards and outcomes.



* As practitioners, policy advocates, and researchers,
certification
is an incentive for us. It helps us push for systems that acknowledge
the
incredible resource that ABE/TESOL instructors are within adult
education.
We can use certification processes to remind policy makers and managers
of
our skills and knowledge and the impact that this provides on our
communities.





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Message: 5
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 10:22:38 -0400
From: "Miriam Burt" <mburt at cal.org>
Subject: [PD 5706] PD for experienced teachers on the road to
credentialing
To: "The Adult Literacy Professional Development Discussion List"
<professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID: <7E0B624DDF68104F92C38648A4D93D8F0B0D1E05 at MAIL.cal.local>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, all.



Sorry if the message below is a little long.



I thought it might be useful to look at kinds of PD to offer on the road
to credentialing. While it is true that there is a fair amount of
upheaval in the field, with teachers working part time and leaving
frequently, there are many teachers who stay more than 5 years. When
resources are limited, it's often the case that the training events and
PD that are offered - whether voluntary or mandatory, incentive-ized
(is that a word?) or not -are often geared toward the new instructors.
It's not surprising that there may be some reluctance on the part of the
more experienced teachers to attend one more session on basic skills or
participate in one more what works session.



Experts in reflective teaching practice, Richards and Farrell, (2005, p.
7) suggest that expert teachers tend to share the following
characteristics, setting them apart from novice teachers:

* A rich and elaborate knowledge base

* Ability to integrate and use different kinds of knowledge

* Ability to make intuitive judgments based on past experience

* Desire to investigate and solve a wide range of teaching
problems

* Deeper understanding of students' needs and student learning

* Awareness of instructional objectives to support teaching

* Better understanding and use of language learning strategies

* Greater awareness of the learning context

* Greater fluidity and automaticity in teaching

* Greater efficiency and effectiveness in lesson planning

How do teachers acquire these skills beyond just putting in time?

Huberman (1993), identifies three actions taken by teachers in
non-novice stages of professional development that are likely to lead to
the development of expertise and long-term career satisfaction.

* They shift roles. Experienced teachers might teach a new
subject or a new learner level. Alternatively, they might mentor or
coach new teachers or take on other responsibilities..

* They engage in classroom-level experimentation. Experienced
teachers might change classroom routines or engage in action research

* They participate in activities that challenge their knowledge
and stretch their skills. Experienced teachers learn more about a topic
in their field, replace their customary materials or activities, or
otherwise push themselves to the edge of their competence

So basically, rather than engaging in static PD, it seems that
activities offered in credentialing should include opportunities for
mentoring or coaching, doing action research, and practitioner-chosen
self study.

By the way, the above information is taken from the brief Professional
Development for Experienced Teachers Working With Adult English Language
Learners
(Rodriguez & McKay, 2010,
http://www.cal.org/caelanetwork/resources/experienced.html)

The complete references are here:

References

Huberman, M. (1993). Burnout in teaching careers. European Journal of
Teacher Education, 30(4), 351-381.993

Richards, J. C., & Farrell, T. S. C. (2005). Professional development
for language teachers. New York: Cambridge University Press,

Rodriguez, A.,G., & McKay, S. (2010) Professional development for
experienced teachers working with adult English language learners.
Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics. Available at
http://www.cal.org/caelanetwork/resources/experienced.html). Reviewed at
http://lincs.ed.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/abstracts/programplanning/
RC_plan_abs50


Here, at long last, is my question: Are there models out there where
credentialing that is offered to experienced teachers utilizes these
types of activities?

Best,

Miriam



Miriam Burt

Center for Applied Linguistics

mburt at cal.org







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Message: 6
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 14:16:10 +0000
From: Virginia Simmons <Vsimmons at horrycountyschools.net>
Subject: [PD 5707] Re: from Stephanie, Need for Math Specialists in AE
To: "jackie at jataylor.net" <jackie at jataylor.net>, The Adult Literacy
Professional Development Discussion List
<professionaldevelopment at lincs.ed.gov>
Message-ID:
<5883375CE97C6A44A8359E9C27D0B28E62045F4C at DOEXBE2.hcsad.LOCAL>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

My priority in hiring for any full time positions is to have math,
science, social studies and English covered. My math teacher teaches
at both full time centers and the students love him. He has a million
different ways to teach one concept and if they don't get it one way, he
can help with another. We have noticed a marked difference in GED math
scores since he came onboard.
If you can convince you powers that be that you need the core curriculum
covered so that you can offer a high school diploma, it is well worth
it.
Virginia Simmons
HOrry County, SC
________________________________
From: professionaldevelopment-bounces at lincs.ed.gov
[professionaldevelopment-bounces at lincs.ed.gov] on behalf of Jackie A.
Taylor [jackie at jataylor.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 2:06 PM
To: 'The Adult Literacy Professional Development Discussion List'
Subject: [PD 5684] from Stephanie, Need for Math Specialists in AE


>From Stephanie Moran, please see below?Jackie Taylor


________________________________
From: Stephanie Moran [mailto:stephanie at durangoaec.org]
Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 1:35 PM
To: jackie at jataylor.net
Subject: Need for Math Specialists in AE

The math wizards at my center really gain a lot of satisfaction from
having helped students to *understand*--when I regularly had to teach
GED math 10 years ago, I called it teaching ?down and dirty??enough for
you to pass the test but nothing elegant or what I?d call true long-term
storage of knowledge and application. We could never go back to those
days?it would be unethical now that our students have access to true
math instructors.

As another poster pointed out, so many of our students come hating math
and often with even more psychological math baggage than other HS
students, that your standard of a math specialist?just as we have a
reading specialist on our faculty?would be a heavenly start.


?I have heard the idea that, as an achievable first goal, we should have
a math specialist available to every AE program. I?ve also heard the
view that many retired math teachers or math specialists frustrated with
the turmoil in K-12 might be more willing to move over to AE than we
think ? even if it pays a bit less. Does anybody think there?s any
truth to these ideas?

Forrest?

________________________________

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