[Technology 955] Re: Technology Digest, Vol 19, Issue 15

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Silver-Pacuilla, Heidi HSilver-Pacuilla at air.org
Thu Apr 19 16:39:11 EDT 2007


Marilyn, Can you elaborate on how you use colored highlighting features
as a tool in peer editing?


Heidi Silver-Pacuilla
American Institutes for Research

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Subject: Technology Digest, Vol 19, Issue 15

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Today's Topics:

1. [Technology 946] Re: Handheld discussion day 3 (Marilyn Williams)
2. [Technology 947] Re: Handheld discussion day 3 (Marilyn Williams)
3. [Technology 948] Re: Subject: RE: handhelds day 2
(McNutt Jr, William R)
4. [Technology 949] Technologies for Adult Literacy (Mariann Fedele)
5. [Technology 950] Re: Handheld discussion day 3 (Marilyn Williams)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2007 11:56:21 -0700
From: Marilyn Williams <williams_ma at 4j.lane.edu>
Subject: [Technology 946] Re: Handheld discussion day 3
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>
Message-ID: <f58580182b7d.462758e5 at 4j.lane.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi Charla,
The Brainchild Study Buddy sounds really intriguing; I'm going to have
to check this out!

I'd certainly stronly encourage you to try out Inspiration. I love the
way it gives students a way
to organize their thoughts and ideas. It's basic function is as a
brainstorming tool. You enter
your idea and then just hit 'Rapid Fire' to keep adding your
brainstorms. Then, the kids can
group their ideas in categories, they can indicate relationships between
the ideas and start
adding details and subtopics to the ideas they want to use. Then, the
students take their ideas
and can write their paragraph/essay. For example, we'll do a 'vacation'
topic and the students
will just record absolutely everything they can think of for places
they've been. Then I have
them choose their top 3 and start to add details (or notes) about that
place or event. When they
transfer the data to a word processing document, they have 3 paragraphs
practically written.
The response is often something like, "You tricked us into writing an
essay!" It's great because it
was done in small chunks so kids didn't feel overwhelmed and it all fits
together because the
outline kept them focused.
Sometimes, I will start off by giving them the outline and then having
them fill it in. For
example, if you're doing research on a country, you could give them the
subtopics of economy,
government, culture, education etc.
As you can tell, this is just a really basic overview. The Computer
Based Study Strategies
(CBSS), developed through CATE at the U of O, are a series of lessons
designed to use this tool
to help kids with a variety of tasks (textbook notetaking, synthesizing
information, vocabulary
study etc.). If you send me an address, I'd be happy to get you a copy.
We also have designed
these for use with the Palm.

Hope that helps!
Marilyn

Marilyn Williams
6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies
Kennedy Middle School
Eugene, OR

----- Original Message -----
From: "Eales, Charla" <Charla.Eales at doc.mo.gov>
Date: Thursday, April 19, 2007 11:21 am
Subject: [Technology 943] Re: Handheld discussion day 3
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>


> We use Brainchild Study Buddy in our classrooms. It seems the

students

> like it because it fits in their hands and looks age appropriate and

> with earphones no one knows what they have in front of them.

> The sales person we deal with will bring in the unit and the content

> cartridges and allow the staff to look at it and see how it correlates

> with the curriculum. You can view the web version and some lessons @

> www.brainchild.com.

>

> ________________________________

>

> From: technology-bounces at nifl.gov [

> ----------------------------------------------------

> National Institute for Literacy

> Technology and Literacy mailing list

> Technology at nifl.gov

> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

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------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2007 11:57:39 -0700
From: Marilyn Williams <williams_ma at 4j.lane.edu>
Subject: [Technology 947] Re: Handheld discussion day 3
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>
Message-ID: <f587809e29e6.46275933 at 4j.lane.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi Gretchen,
I'd direct you to the work of Dr. Lynne Anderson-Inman and Dr. Mark
Horney at the University
of Oregon. I'll also forward your question to them and they can give
you further info.

Marilyn

Marilyn Williams
6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies
Kennedy Middle School
Eugene, OR

----- Original Message -----
From: "Starks-Martin, Gretchen A. " <gastarks at stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Thursday, April 19, 2007 11:21 am
Subject: [Technology 942] Re: Handheld discussion day 3
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>


> I am also interested in any published research on the effectiveness of

> Inspiration to teach reading and cognitive mapping. Does anyone know?



>

>

>

>

> Gretchen

>

>

>

> Dr. Gretchen Starks-Martin

>

> Academic Learning Center

>

> St. Cloud State University

>

> 720 Fourth Avenue South

>

> St. Cloud, MN 56301-4498

>

> (320)308-4742

>

> FAX: (320) 308-0959

>

> gastarks at stcloudstate.edu

>

> www.stcloudstate.edu/alc/

>

>

>

> ________________________________

>

> From: technology-bounces at nifl.gov [

> ----------------------------------------------------

> National Institute for Literacy

> Technology and Literacy mailing list

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> To unsubscribe or change your subscription settings, please go to

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------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2007 15:05:06 -0400
From: "McNutt Jr, William R" <mcnutt at utk.edu>
Subject: [Technology 948] Re: Subject: RE: handhelds day 2
To: "The Technology and Literacy Discussion List"
<technology at nifl.gov>
Cc: cdurant1 at utk.edu, tkoosman at utk.edu, solveig at utk.edu,
jjstephe at utk.edu, mcannady at utk.edu, rew at utk.edu,
baponder at utk.edu,
blong at utk.edu, arivera1 at utk.edu, "McNutt Jr, William R"
<mcnutt at utk.edu>, rkulesz at utk.edu
Message-ID:

<0913EC48F2B05C4FBE4878BAFCABBFEC360379 at KFSVS2.utk.tennessee.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I just had an experience I thought I would share with ya'll. Recently,
my beloved Dell Axim X51 handheld had a stroke, and I had to replace it.
I ordered a new one from dell.com and got a better screen and more
memory in the new model. Adding the network capability that I use, it
came to slightly more than $500.00. My wife bought a Treo smartphone
that does just about everything my Axim does for less.



Two weeks later, announced that they were dead-ending the Axim line. I
can no longer find my brand-new handheld on the dell web site.
Subsequent looking around reveals that the conventional wisdom among the
technorati is that handheld computers have had their day in the sun.
The smart money is betting on the smartphone, like the Blackjack and the
Treo replacing the handheld for most functions.



Bill McNutt



________________________________

From: technology-bounces at nifl.gov [mailto:technology-bounces at nifl.gov]
On Behalf Of Mariann Fedele
Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2007 2:26 PM
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List
Subject: [Technology 945] Subject: RE: handhelds day 2



The following question is submitted on behalf of Mike Moyle:

Marilyn,

Thank you for sharing with us. Our fifth grade has used Palms for
several years. They are used primarily for writing but also for math
facts, organizing assignments, drawing with Sketchy, and understanding
tessellations. The teachers are about to use them with paam.goknow.com
Internet so the student can sync with that site when their homework is
done, and the teacher can instantly see it.

Our school is considering 1-to-1 technology with tablet laptop computers
for grades 7-12. The teachers were each given a tablet and four days of
training this summer.

I'm trying to decide whether handhelds or tablets are the better way to
go for Lower School. You've identified the cost factor. If that is the
primary driving force, the handhelds probably are the best bet. I do
worry, though, about not having access to the connectivity with the web
and the ability to create through programs like PowerPoint, Movie Maker,
etc. It seems that the handhelds have a very narrow focus of abilities
compared to a laptop or tablet. I don't know, however, if this is a
completely accurate view. I'd love to hear more about that.

I was interested to read about your project with creating governments.
I keep thinking that the technology is only a tool, and it's extremely
important to make sure we are using it in a way that is helping students
think at higher levels, make connections, and be creative.

Mike Moyle
Lower School Director
The Principia

-----Original Message-----
From: technology-bounces at nifl.gov [mailto:technology-bounces at nifl.gov]
On Behalf Of Marilyn Williams
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 9:19 AM
To: technology at nifl.gov
Subject: [Technology 936] handhelds day 2

Hi all,
Thanks again for participating in the discussion today. Please send me
any comments or questions as I'd love to establish a dialogue with you!

As it closer to school starting and despite two full days of training, I
was still feeling apprehensive about starting the Palm project.
Nonetheless, students were back at school a week later and I had to be
ready to go.
Our first day, I introduced the fact that we had the opportunity to use
the handhelds and explained that everyone would need to take home the
permission form and have it back before we would begin to use the Palms.
I thought this would give me a week or so of breathing room!
Of course, they all came back the next day! So, taking a deep breath,
we jumped in.
Those first few days were a little chaotic! I did have some basic plans
developed but, for the most part, we played. We experimented with
different functions and sent messages to one another. We also saved our
work and set up categories (or files).

One of the most helpful pieces of equipment I used was a FlexCam. This
is a camera that has a flexible neck that can be bent to show whatever
the teacher is working on. They are often used in science classes so
all the students can watch a teacher do a dissection or other
experiment.
This allowed me to demonstrate which buttons or icons to tap and how and
where to enter information on a screen. It really was (and still is)
invaluable.

Our first lessons were basic how to enter information. We played with
writing Graffiti, using the built in keyboard as well as the external
keyboard. A fun game to use when learning Graffiti is called Giraffe.

As we all became more proficient, I started using the Palms in 'real'
lessons. At first, it was a stretch to think of how I would use them
but as they became part of my repertoire, it was second nature. One of
the earlier projects we did was on government. I divided students into
groups and their task was to create a society. Each group had a set of
categories to address such as school, laws, justice, economy etc. Each
student worked on their section then everyone beamed their portion to
each other so the entire group had everyone's work. This was a great way
to keep them organized and if anyone lost their work, they could easily
retrieve it.

Daily, we used our Palms for silent reading responses as well as a unit
on word parts. We kept a list and definitions and examples of literary
terms and devices. We wrote poetry which worked great as I beamed
everyone a template and instructions and then they could work
independently.
I know I keep mentioning beaming and I should perhaps explain this
function. This allows a person to just point their Palm at another
Palm, tap 'Beam' and the data is transferred from one to another. After
a bit of practice we got so we could beam a piece of data to everyone in
the class in the same amount of time it would take to pass out papers.
I would beam to one student, they would beam to another while I got
someone else started etc.

It was important for us to organize the Palms in a way that they were
easily accessible so I set up a series of small drawers which contained
each person's Palm and keyboard. Students were responsible to make sure
their Palm was charged and available and, for the most part, this worked
well. If someone forgot theirs at home, they ended up having to use
paper and pencil and that was usually enough deterrent that it wasn't
left at home again.

The biggest advantage of Palms, for me, was the way it leveled the
playing field, so to speak, for all my students. I had taught some of
these students since sixth grade in a resource (pull
out) block and had never been able to get them interested in writing.
Now that they had this tool and the example of their peers, they became
much more engaged and I was so pleased with the progress they made.
They felt much more positive about themselves as learners as well.

Fortunately, we had a class set of Palms so everyone had access. In a
setting without a class set, I might establish a 'Palm learning center'
as part of a rotation. At that center, I'd probably have assignments
listed and have students work in a more individual way. It certainly is
more difficult to incorporate any kind of technology when students have
to share.

So far, we've lost only 1 handheld over 3 years!

Marilyn Williams
6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies
Kennedy Middle School
Eugene, OR
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Mariann Fedele

Associate Director,

NYC Regional Adult Education Network

Literacy Assistance Center

Moderator,
NIFL Technology and Literacy Discussion List
32 Broadway 10th Floor
New York, New York 10004
212-803-3325
mariannf at lacnyc.org
www.lacnyc.org



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Message: 4
Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2007 14:43:25 -0400
From: "Mariann Fedele" <MariannF at lacnyc.org>
Subject: [Technology 949] Technologies for Adult Literacy
To: "The Technology and Literacy Discussion List"
<technology at nifl.gov>
Message-ID:
<6E8BC13A30982C44BCD32B38FB8F5AB83BDE8B at lac-exch.lacnyc.local>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The following message is posted on behalf of Tom Sticht:


April 19, 2007

Technologies for the Adult Literacy Classroom

Tom Sticht
International Consultant in Adult Education

Nowadays a number of adults are coming to classes to learn to read and
write. There are several technologies that the teacher may use to help
these pupils learn. Here are a few.

1. Chalkboards. These are more and more familiar to teachers. They are
large
black slates (sometimes now in green) on which teachers may write with
chalk. For instance, a pupil may give his or her name and the teacher
can
write it on the chalkboard and show the pupil and class how to spell,
write, and read the pupil's name. This can be done with lots of other
words, or even sentences, too. Be sure not to stand with one's back to
the
class for long, as this is not interesting to the pupils. At the end of
class, some of the adults may be called upon to help clean the
chalkboard
and erasers. This can promote friendships in the class! [NOTE: Some
progressive teachers are now using different colored chalks to highlight
important information.]

2. Newspaper print. Sometimes the local newspaper will have some
newspaper
print left on the end of a role after printing the newspaper. Teachers
can
ask for this newsprint paper, which comes in a large role. It can be cut
up
into sheets that can be taped to the walls of the classroom (not on
wallpaper however!) and written upon to record the words and sentences
that
pupils will want to study as they walk around the room and look at the
paper
hanging on the walls. [NOTE: Some progressive teachers are now using
different colored ink pens to highlight important information.]

3. Overhead projectors. These audio-visual tools let the teacher write
on
transparent film and project the writing onto a light-colored wall or
movie
screen. With a newer device, the Xerox machine, the teacher can make
photocopies of pages of books, photos, charts and other materials and
project them on the wall. This can be used to illustrate various aspects
of
writing and reading to pupils. [NOTE: Make certain to have one or two
extra
bulbs for the projector in case one burns out!]

4. Filmstrips. There are now strips of photo film that can be projected
one
frame at a time onto a wall or screen and the information on the film
frames can be used to teach reading. The Army made extensive use of
filmstrip materials in World War II and proved the usefulness of this
technology in the classroom for illiterate adults. There are educational
filmstrips available from supply houses so make sure your superintendent
places funds in the budget to purchase both filmstrips and projectors as
well as the other electronic technologies discussed below.

5. Photo novels. The Army also used photo novels to make stories
starring
real people that illiterate soldiers could use to learn to read.
Teachers
can use a Kodak to take photographs and make up these types of photo
novels
for classroom use. The pupils themselves may also take photographs and
make
their own photo novels for their own and their classmate's use.

6. Tape recorders and playback machines. Some teachers are now reading
books
onto audio tapes so that their adult pupils can listen to stories before
trying to read them. Sometimes the pupil can listen and read at the same
time to build up speed in reading while comprehension is maintained by
listening to the spoken words. [NOTE: Sometimes a radio can be used in
the
classroom so that teachers and pupils can listen to an important
broadcast
and then discuss it to build knowledge of current events.]

7. Television. Cassette players are now available to let teachers play
TV
shows in the classroom. Indeed, there are now many educational
cassettes,
including those for teaching various aspects of reading, that teachers
can
use. Many times pupils enjoy these TV materials better than typical
classroom lectures or demonstrations.

8. The 'Binocular Organizer Of Knowledge" or BOOK! I once read this
amusing
name for the old technology that forms the basis for teaching reading.
Of
course, books remain the foundation technology for teaching in our
classrooms. I once read an amusing story by Isaac Asimov, the famous
writer, in which he espoused the wonders of the book: Once printed it
does
not consume any more energy, unlike audio tapes or TV cassettes. It
starts
when looked at and stops when the reader looks away. It stores speech
like
the electronic devices, but lets the reader create his or her own
internal
voice or voices. It lets readers produce their own internal images. It
can
be produced to be carried in the hip pocket and taken to the beach, on
the
train or bus, and so forth to be used without fear of breaking it or
producing any noise to bother others.

9. Finally, we can't forget those old reliable friends, paper and
pencils!
All students should get paper and pencils to be used to learn to write
their names and all the other ideas that are provided in the class by
the
teacher and other pupils.

10. Always maintain a well-lighted classroom, with good ventilation,
warm in
the winter and cool in the summer. Teachers should dress conservatively,
wear a smile and maintain a pleasant disposition. Be friendly, but
professional, with your pupils and conduct activities to bring about a
welcoming atmosphere. An occasional social activity, perhaps with
refreshments such as lemonade and cookies, can help the adults, who may
be
shy about returning to school after a long period, to overcome what
anxieties they may feel and develop a high level of class morale that
can
help all achieve well!

Resource: Asimov, I. (1974, February). The Ancient and the Ultimate.
Journal
of Reading, 17, 264-271.

Thomas G. Sticht
International Consultant in Adult Education
2062 Valley View Blvd.
El Cajon, CA 92019-2059
Tel/fax: (619) 444-9133
Email: tsticht at aznet.net



Mariann Fedele
Associate Director,
NYC Regional Adult Education Network
Literacy Assistance Center
Moderator,
NIFL Technology and Literacy Discussion List
32 Broadway 10th Floor
New York, New York 10004
212-803-3325
mariannf at lacnyc.org
www.lacnyc.org


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2007 12:10:45 -0700
From: Marilyn Williams <williams_ma at 4j.lane.edu>
Subject: [Technology 950] Re: Handheld discussion day 3
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>
Message-ID: <f5a3bdd36ad.46275c45 at 4j.lane.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252

Hi Bonnie,
I'm disappointed to hear of the problems you've had with your Palm.
Unfortunately, I really don't
know much about the different PDA type products on the market. The set
I have were given to
me and I had no input into their selection. When using a program such as
Inspiration which can
use quite a lot of screen space, I often have students switch to the
outline mode where they can
hide or show subtopics and details. By doing this, they can focus on
one area at a time. Also,
in the diagram mode, you can tell the Palm to fit the document to the
screen. This will often
result in a screen which shows all the bubbles but makes it impossible
to read the text as it's
gotten so small. When you tap on a bubble, the topic in that bubble is
displayed at the top of
the screen. Certainly, it's not ideal and, sometimes, a larger screen
will be better and then it
might be more beneficial to use a computer lab. So far, students seem to
be able to work within
the constraints of the program.

When I said some students find writing 'painful', I was referring to the
difficulty many of my
students seem to have with putting their thoughts down on paper.
Sometimes, it's a
manipulation issue (holding a pencil correctly and staying within the
lines). However, sometimes
it seems to be almost an emotional issue of being unwilling or perhaps,
afraid, to share their
thoughts. Of course, I really don't know what's going on in my
student's heads! The bottom
line, for me, has been that using the Palm seems to unlock many of my
students' writing
capabilities and/or willingness to communicate in this way.

Thanks for your insight and comments,
Marilyn

Marilyn Williams
6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies
Kennedy Middle School
Eugene, OR

----- Original Message -----
From: Bonnie Odiorne <bonniesophia at sbcglobal.net>
Date: Thursday, April 19, 2007 11:13 am
Subject: [Technology 940] Re: Handheld discussion day 3
To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>


> Hi, Marilyn, and all,

> I'm visually impaired, and have been delighted to know that I can use

> a Palm, because I can hold it as close to my eyes as I need to. I

> never bothered to learn graffiti, since I prefer the stylus. I do have



> a keyboard, but, again, have had no real reason to use it (I just use

> mine as a planner and a keeper of documents I don't want to lose, to

> back up my jump drive). However, I have gone through several versions

> of Palms because of technological problems. One I tried to use on

> another computer and it wouldn't do anything ever again. I tried

> everything. One just stopped hotsynching, and another had its on/off

> button break. Maybe I'm just hard on mine and these kids are way

> better at this than I am, but despite the correlation laptop/handheld,



> they're still not cheap, and if you're using a program as you describe



> that requires a lot of screen space, I'd suspect you'd need one with a



> color screen, good backlighting and resolution. I'd also like to learn



> more about students

> with disabilities finding it "painful" to write: could you elaborate?

> Best,

> Bonnie Odiorne, Writing Center Director, Post University

>

>

> ----- Original Message ----

> From: Marilyn Williams <williams_ma at 4j.lane.edu>

> To: technology at nifl.gov

> Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2007 10:07:53 AM

> Subject: [Technology 939] Handheld discussion day 3

>

>

> We?ve talked a little about some of the benefits, obstacles and

> outcomes of the Palm project but

> I?d like to expand on some of those today.

>

> I?ll start with the negatives. I don?t think it?s possible to use

> technology without running into

> obstacles! Something always seems to freeze or crash or disappear

> into Neverland! However, I

> think those situations have been pretty minimal considering how much

> the Palms are used. One

> problem is that if a Palm loses its charge completely, the

> information, and any new applications

> which you installed, will be lost. The way to get around this is to

> have students regularly

> HotSync (upload their files to another computer) their data and then

> it can be retrieved. This is

> a good lesson for students and does more to remind them than telling

> them over and over to be

> sure to keep their Palms charged. Palms do freeze on occasion and,

> again, if you haven?t backed

> up data, it?s lost. Sometimes, they can be reset and the info is

> still there but sometimes it?s

> gone. On the plus side of that scenario, a student can easily

> retrieve general information, like a

> worksheet or vocabulary list, from someone else. Palms are small,

> which is a benefit but they

> can easily be left on a desk, on top of the locker or in a pocket. So



> far, knock on wood, we?ve

> always had Palms returned to us. At this point, some of our keyboards

> are wearing out and have

> lost some of their keys. The stylus is also easily mislaid, misplaced

> or lost, as well.

>

> That being said, the benefits have far outweighed the obstacles, in my



> opinion. Those of you

> who work with students with learning disabilities have probably found

> that writing can be

> especially painful. I often experienced a lot of frustration on the

> student?s part in trying to get

> thoughts recorded. Then, after finally getting something on paper, any



> revision or editing

> suggestion which involved erasure or rearranging was very difficult.

> I found that students were

> much more willing to alter their writing when doing it in an

> electronic format. It?s much easier

> to copy and paste or cut and paste than it is to erase and remember

> what you wanted to write.

> Students also use colors to highlight places they want to reconsider

> which is an effective peer

> revision tool. One strategy we use a lot is to develop an outline in

> Inspiration (sometimes I give

> them the topics and they fill in the details and sometimes they come

> up with everything on their

> own) and then transfer the outline to Documents. Once in Documents,

> they just write their

> paragraphs from the outline that they can refer to easily. Then, they

> delete the outline and

> they?ve got a paragraph (or 2 or 3). Once written, their work can be

> beamed and printed and

> look just as good as anyone else?s.

>

> I think the Palms have really helped generate more equity in my

> classes. Sometimes it?s a not

> so academic student who is helping to figure out how to troubleshoot a



> problem. Every person?s

> work can be easily read and shared by others. Papers don?t become dog

> eared and left on the

> floor as they are all stored in the Palm. Some students, and their

> parents, worry about the cost

> of replacing their Palm if it?s lost or damaged. So far, we?ve only

> had to deal with this once and

> we had the student come in and do some kind of work for us at school.

>

> I hope you?ve gotten a glimpse into the potential of using these

> devices in a classroom. Please

> let me know if I can clarify or expand on any of the information I?ve

> shared.

>

> Thanks!

>

>

> Marilyn Williams

> 6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies

> Kennedy Middle School

> Eugene, OR

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End of Technology Digest, Vol 19, Issue 15
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