[Technology 967] Re: M-learning through cell phones

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Debra Smith dlmsmith at sbcglobal.net
Mon Apr 23 15:35:04 EDT 2007


In beginning ESL for adults, I have used the 'record' feature on students'
mobile phones to individualize instruction, recording short sound files to
let students listen outside of class to something they were having
difficulty mastering, and I have used mobiles in class to have students
practice model telephone dialogues with a tutor (My child will be absent
from school today; What time does the store close? etc.). It's enough harder
to talk without seeing a face, and sound is enough less clear on a phone
than in person, that the exercise seemed worthwhile.
Debra Morris Smith


On 4/23/07, David J. Rosen <djrosen at comcast.net> wrote:

>

> Marilyn and others,

>

> Cell phones (called mobile phones in much of the rest of the world)

> are being used for learning projects in classrooms (and outside) by

> high school students. M-Learning is also being done with young

> adults in the U.K., South Africa and Australia. See:

>

> http://www.m-learning.org/

>

> This is a web site in the U.K. devoted to m-learning, and it

> describes a multi-year project focused on basic skills learning for

> school dropouts aged 16-24. Handhelds, especially mobile phones, are

> ubiquitous in youth culture in developed, as well as in many areas of

> developing countries. They are as comfortable to young people as

> pencils and pens. They also allow access from a wide variety of

> places, and at any time. The instruction is designed in game format,

> using appealing graphics, and with content of interest to young

> adults. The youth involved in the three-year project, from 2001-

> 2004, were not enrolled in any education or training and were

> unemployed, underemployed, or even homeless. The m-learning

> infrastructure includes a Learning Management System and a

> "microportal interface" which together enable access to m-learning

> materials and services from a variety of mobile devices plus web and

> TV access.

>

> On the web site, look at the interactive demos and the video clips

> (right sidebar menu) . Notice that some of the m-learning projects

> involved "embedded" contextualized workplace learning http://www.m-

> learning.org/projects.shtml .

>

> Two other examples of Mobile Learning:

>

> 1. ACT (college) entrance test preparation ($20)

> http://www.handmark.com/products/detail.php?id=402

>

> 2. News by phone, for example ABE News

> http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/Wireless/ , or

> CNN toGO http://www.cnn.com/togo/

>

> Mobile learning (M-learning) is also called HDUL (handheld devices

> for ubiquitous learning, pronounced "huddle" I guess). You can read

> some research on it at: http://gseacademic.harvard.edu/~hdul/

>

> You'll find a pretty good bibliography of (mostly online) resources

> on m-learning at http://www3.telus.net/~kdeanna/mlearning/related%

> 20links.htm

>

> Here's an example of a project for low-literate ESOL students that

> someone could try:

>

> Using a cell phone camera, an ESOL student project might be to build

> a picture dictionary of their own. Students photograph objects they

> want to know the English word for (the cell phone is a handy way to

> do that just when they discover they don't know the word) and then

> send the photo to a Web page. Later they -- or other students --

> look up the English word for the picture and add it beneath the

> picture, possibly with a short audio file in which the word is

> pronounced. Perhaps a creative teacher on this list has already done

> such a project and you could send us the URL.

>

> Is anyone on the technology discussion list doing M-learning with

> adults or out-of-school youth?

> I have added a page about mobile learning (m-learning, i.e. learning

> delivered to cell phones or PDAs) to The Literacy List at:

>

> http://www.newsomeassociates.com (scroll to the bottom, select

> "publications", then "The Literacy list," then "mobile learning")

>

> or

>

> http://www.alri.org/literacylist.html

>

> http://alri.org/litlist/mlearning.html

>

> Anyone, please let me know if you have suggestions of other resources

> which should be included on the m-learning page (or any other page)

> of The Literacy List.

>

> David J. Rosen

> djrosen at comcast.net

>

>

> On Apr 23, 2007, at 10:39 AM, Marilyn Williams wrote:

>

> > Wouldn't it be something if our students' back to school materials

> > list one day included a cell

> > phone! The cell phone is part of most/many student's lives already,

> > maybe we should be looking

> > at it as an educational tool rather than something that doesn't

> > have a place in the classroom.

> >

> > Marilyn

> >

> > Marilyn Williams

> > 6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies

> > Kennedy Middle School

> > Eugene, OR

> >

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > From: Lissa probus <joyess1 at gmail.com>

> > Date: Friday, April 20, 2007 10:31 pm

> > Subject: [Technology 963] Re: handhelds day 2

> > To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov>

> >

> >> The cell phone thing has my attention lately. Much of the low end

> >> of the

> >> digital divide access the web via cell. Mini-chunks? Word of the

> >> day via

> >> text? Picture word induction?

> >> Interesting.

> >>

> >> Lissa Probus

> >> IDT ODU

> >>

> >> On 4/20/07, Marilyn Williams <williams_ma at 4j.lane.edu> wrote:

> >>>

> >>> I understand that there are sites doing some pretty creative work

> >>> with

> >>> cellphones. An issue

> >>> would be availability (would the school purchase cellphones and a 2

> >> year

> >>> plan?) as well as

> >>> uniformity (if students used their own, might be difficult to

> >> teach). I

> >>> don't know if cell phones

> >>> can upload/download the same kinds of applications which have been

> >>> developed for computers

> >>> and PDAs either. The portability of a cellphone would certainly be

> >>> something to consider.

> >>>

> >>> Marilyn Williams

> >>> 6th Grade Language Arts/Social Studies

> >>> Kennedy Middle School

> >>> Eugene, OR

> >>>

> >>> ----- Original Message -----

> >>> From: Mariann Fedele <MariannF at lacnyc.org>

> >>> Date: Friday, April 20, 2007 1:40 pm

> >>> Subject: [Technology 960] Re: handhelds day 2

> >>> To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List

> >>> <technology at nifl.gov>

> >>>

> >>>> This message is being posted on behalf of Kuulei Reeser:

> >>>>

> >>>> What about cell phones? They appear to have similar features to

> >>>> handhelds

> >>>> plus have internet access and are a lot more affordable and

> >>>> accessible

> >>>> to

> >>>> the students.

> >>>>

> >>>> -----Original Message-----

> >>>> From: technology-bounces at nifl.gov [

> >>>> ----------------------------------------------------

> >>>> National Institute for Literacy

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>

> David J. Rosen

> djrosen at comcast.net

>

>

>

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