[Technology 1433] Re: retrospective

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Marian Thacher mthacher at otan.us
Fri Dec 21 11:50:30 EST 2007


Apple IIGS was the first computer I had in my classroom too. Graphics and
sound - wow! Now the graphics would seem very quaint, I'm sure, but they
did add interest to the software. But mainly we used FredWriter, a free
word processing program - green letters on a dark screen. It didn't have
bells and whistles, but I was very happy not to have to deal with DOS!

Marian Thacher
OTAN

The Technology and Literacy Discussion List <technology at nifl.gov> on
Friday, December 21, 2007 at 7:27 AM -0800 wrote:

>"What are the “wow’ moments for the students you work with?

>

>Best, Mariann"

>

>

>

>I've had a few of these moments but I'll share two that are some of my

>oldest:

>

>

>

>I used to teach at computer camps during vacation weeks, morning and

>afternoon sessions. These camps were for youngster. We used Commodore

>64's with external tape drives. We used the program "Logo" to teach

>basic programming. We couldn't get the AM group of students out before

>the PM group of students started arriving, the student just didn't want

>to finish. We then had the parents coming by to pick their kids up

>asking "What is the best computers" to buy for their Kids, because they

>saw how involved with the computer their children were. At the time Texas

>Instrument - TI 99 were being discontinuing and selling for I think about

>$50 at the time. You needed to buy all the software you wanted to use at

>the same time as it wasn't going be available for much longer. Of course

>because they were discontinuing the line there was no tech support.

>Regardless of the equipment I asked the parents what did they wanted to

>"Do" with the computer. They didn't know, and the kids were too new to

>the technology to know what they wanted to do or the capability. I still

>get asked what is the "best" computer to buy and I still have the same

>question I did back them, find out what software you want to run and buy

>a computer that will do it for you. I went back to recommending the

>Commodore 64's because it was going to be around for a longer time. Who

>knew at the time how short a time it would be with technology that move

>forward so quickly.

>

>

>

>The 2nd AHH moment was when I worked at a rehabilitation center in the

>late 80's early 90's. They received a few Apple GS machines, we then

>went out and bought, [2nd hand] a few more to have like equipment in the

>center. The students were adult's with varying disabilities. The staff

>working with the students asked why we were bringing in computers, if I

>can't use them how in the world could these students with the

>disabilities be able to use them. We had a gentleman that didn't

>communicate, lived within himself, didn't interact with any of the other

>clients. We sat him in front of one of the Apple GS's with some software

>we thought he'd like. He was totally engaged, trying to figure out what

>this was all about. After some time we thought he'd had enough time and

>we were going to move on the some other clients turn with the computer we

>couldn't tear him away from the PC. We found the only way we could get

>him to move on was to turn off the computer and only then did we find he

>was willingly to go on his merry way. He wasn't the only client that

>took to the computer tool. But the AHH moment wasn't the student it was

>the staff watching and becoming convinced that this tool just might be

>useable for some students. And they found they would give it a try to

>learn to use it themselves.

>

>

>

>AHHH going down memory lane & realizing how far computers and the users

>have really come.

>

>

>

>Eunice Snay

>Central SABES Regional Technologist

>508-854-4514

>esnay at qcc.mass.edu

>...

>===========================================================================

>

>

>From: technology-bounces at nifl.gov [mailto:technology-bounces at nifl.gov] On

>Behalf Of akira at boston sabes

>Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2007 4:26 PM

>To: The Technology and Literacy Discussion List

>Subject: [Technology 1420] Re: retrospective

>

>

>

>

>

>

>fun thread idea !

>

>I think the most useful thing that I did in the beginning (mid to late

>80s) was to use

>PINE, a unix commnad line email program and also read usenet news groups.

>This was when the world wide web was only text based and strickly

>non-commercial !

>My how things have changed.

>

>These two things really made me think WOW this is revolutionary stuff !

>Instant communication; one to one and one to many from all over the world

>!

>

>-Akira

>

>._____________________________________________________________________.

>

> AKIRA KAMIYA

> Adult Literacy Resource Institute

> Computer Field Technologist - Greater Boston

>

> Tel 617-287-4075

> The people have the power... to wrestle the earth from fools

> -Patti Smith

>.______________________________________________________________________.

>

>On 12/20/07 3:51 PM, "Mariann Fedele" <MariannF at lacnyc.org> wrote:

>

>Hello all,

>It’s a good time of the year to take stock and reflect. A recent CNN

>article (link below) begins, “Like a first love or a first car, a first

>computer can hold a special place in people's hearts. For millions of

>kids who grew up in the 1980s, that first computer was the Commodore 64.

>Twenty-five years later, that first brush with computer addiction is as

>strong as ever.”

>

>For you, what was that first piece of hardware, software, or internet

>application that captured your imagination and brought you in to the

>technophile/techie fold?

>When working with your students is there something that is sure to get

>them hooked and motivated to explore using new technologies?

>

>I was a Commodore 64 owner myself. It was mostly used for playing Pong,

>but it was fun and was a gateway. How about you?

>

>[ http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/ptech/12/07/c64/index.html

>]http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/ptech/12/07/c64/index.html

>

>

>Mariann Fedele

>Director,

>NYC Regional Adult Education Network

>Literacy Assistance Center

>Moderator,

>NIFL Technology and Literacy Discussion List

>32 Broadway 10th Floor

>New York, New York 10004

>212-803-3325

>mariannf at lacnyc.org [ mailto:mariannf at lacnyc.org ]

>www.lacnyc.org [ http://www.lacnyc.org ]

>

>

>

>

>

> #######################################################################

>

>

>----------------------------------------------------

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>

>

>

>--

>

>

>

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