Improving Adult Literacy Instruction: Options for Practice and Research Study Circle Discussions - Bios - Professional Development Discussion List

Improving Adult Literacy Instruction: Options for Practice and Research Study Circle Discussions
November 28 - December 9, 2011

Discussion Description | Preparation

Guests' Biographies

 


Image removed.Stephanie Moran, Program Coordinator, Durango Adult Education Center, Colorado

Stephanie Moran has been an adult educator and the GED Coordinator at the Durango Adult Education Center in Durango, Colorado for eleven years and an adjunct instructor for Southwest Colorado Community College in Literature, Reading, and Composition since 2001. Since 2006, she has served as secretary for CAEPA, the Colorado Adult Education Professional Association. She earned her Literacy Instruction Authorization (LIA) in 2005 and taught an online adult education course for the LIA for Colorado Community Colleges Online. She has taught at six colleges, designed curriculum for a bridge program that transitions GED and high school graduates into college more successfully, a course in study skills, and several courses in theme-based instruction. She earned the Fort Lewis College Service Award in May 2003, the Teacher of the Year Award from CAEPA in 2004, was nominated as an Extraordinary Woman by the Durango Woman’s Resource Center in 2010, and earned the 2011 Award of Excellence from the Mountain Plains Adult Education Association for making a significant contribution to adult education in Colorado.

 

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Andy Nash, Professional Development Specialist, World Education, Massachusetts

Andy Nash has been an adult educator for 25 years. From 1990 to 1997, she was adjunct professor in the Graduate Bilingual/ESOL Studies Department of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. Since then, she has coordinated professional development projects at World Education, where she specializes in ESL, standards-based instruction, learner persistence, participatory practice, and the integration of civic participation with adult learning. In 2008-9, she directed the New England Learner Persistence (NELP) Project, in which 18 programs investigated promising persistence strategies in their diverse contexts. She is co-author of Making it Worth the Stay, a report on the NELP findings, developer of a companion website (www.nelrc.org/persist), and creator of many other adult education resources.

 

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