Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development - Part 1: The Multi-Dimensions of Staff Development-Using Videos for Instructor PD - Full Transcript - Professional Development Discussion List

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development - Part 1: The Multi-Dimensions of Staff Development-Using Videos for Instructor Professional Development

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Day Two:

Day Three:

Day Four:

Day Five:


Day One: Experiences Using Video for Professional Development

Subject: [PD 5801] Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Good day or evening!

Today begins our guest discussion of Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I (July 25 - 29).

Using video for staff development may afford us new opportunities for reflection and professional learning. For example, it can give us an inside view of another teacher's classroom; it may give us insights on our own teaching or facilitation if we watched ourselves on video.

Please consider the questions below and share your thoughts on any one of these or related questions:

  • How are staff developers using video in professional development (PD)? How do you use video in your online or face-to-face PD workshops or courses?
  • Have you ever used video as a professional development tool in your program? If so, how did your group review and process the video in order to share thoughts, give feedback and get the maximum benefit? How did teachers receive this?
  • What is video best at? What can video do that no other medium can do as well? How effective of a staff development tool is it or can it be? How do we know?
  • What are the possibilities for using video in staff development?

I look forward to hearing from you,

Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5802] Use of video as a PD Tool
From: Dionne, Nancy
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

I haven't used videos in any PD presentations I've done nor have I received any PD where it has been used. I am looking forward to this discussion and learning about how others have used it and how I might begin to use it and also support staff in using it.

Nancy Dionne

Adult Education Professional Development Coordinator

State of Maine Department of Education

Augusta, Maine


Subject: [PD 5803] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Hi Jackie and Everyone,

I want to start by responding to the question What is video best at? One of the things I felt when I was teaching was a sense of isolation. It was good and bad. I liked being able to manage my classroom without much oversight, and to be able to respond to student needs as they arose, but on the other hand I had little idea what other teachers were doing, and also whether what I was doing was as effective as it could be.

It's hard to find time and funding for teachers to observe each other, and video is the next best thing. It's a peak into someone else's classroom. When learning about a new teaching strategy or technique, there is no substitute for actually seeing it in action. That really gives you the model of what you are aiming for, or even some things to avoid.

Also, video allows a group of teachers to observe a strategy and discuss together. In California we have some professional development modules that use video to demonstrate teaching strategies step by step. I was trained on these (a long time ago!) and I still remember how effective that was.

In another way, video can introduce a new idea in a vivid way. On the OTAN Video Gallery (http://www.otan.us/browse/index.cfm?fuseaction=page&catid=33160, sign-in required, but registration is quick) we have quite a few videos that are quick snippets of teachers using a particular technology for a particular purpose. Our idea is to provide access to ideas and examples that can be used for individual or group professional development.

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD


Subject: [PD 5805] Re: Use of video as a PD Tool
From: Anderson, Philip
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

I am also looking forward to this discussion of the use of video as a PD tool.

In Florida, we have a mini-curriculum with PD support for ESOL teachers to address the topic of human trafficking. When we did the trainings for teachers on how to use the curriculum in the classroom, we used at least one video that presented short dialogues by people who had been trafficked. I was always struck by how the audience changed from before they watched the video to after they watched it. The focus and attention they devoted to the topic became more urgent. Questions began right away after seeing the video. Statements came out automatically like, "Wow, I never imagined it was happening here, and in this day!"

I have been in classroom settings where showing a film felt like a good chance to catch a short catnap. This training stood out as a contrast to that. For one thing, the video clips were too short for naps, being about 3-4 minutes in length. And the presenters prepared us by letting us know we would be talking about it after we saw it.

The video and the way it was presented took us to MMU: Memorable, Meaningful and Useful. The content hooks itself into the memory, it had real meaning, and it made me feel that I was participating in something that was very much needed by the students we work with.

If anyone is interested in the materials on human trafficking for ESOL teachers, go to this web link: http://www.cahr.fsu.edu/esol.html. Information about the topic and videos can be found at http://www.freetheslaves.net/ and http://www.freetheslaves.net/Page.aspx?pid=316.

Philip Anderson


Subject: [PD 5806] Why use video for adult education professional development?
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Why use video for adult education professional development?

As the co-founder of the Media Library of Teaching Skills I thought it might be useful to explain what the needs were that led to the creation of this free web-based video library for adult basic (including ESOL/ESL) education teachers.

In the mid-1980's when I became the director of the Adult Literacy Resource Institute, sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Boston and Roxbury Community College, I visited adult education programs and talked with teachers about what kind of professional development they thought they needed. Nearly all said that they would like to visit other teachers' classrooms. At the Adult Literacy Resource Institute, we set up a program where our staff would help to arrange these visits, to process what was learned from them, and to substitute teach to make the visits possible. This was a great model, but it wasn't sustainable. Many years later I thought, what if we could video teachers' classrooms and make these "video windows into other teachers' classrooms" available on the Web for teachers to see and discuss?

I was inspired by the work of Public Television Station WGBH several years ago when they developed a library of math videos of classrooms whose teachers who understood and used the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards. This was a brilliant way to help other teachers, who had not seen the standards in action, to understand what the standards actually look like in practice.

Another inspiration was a GED teacher in Kentucky, Barry Burkett who several years ago set up an inexpensive video camera in his classroom and video recorded his own teaching and shared it with colleagues on the Technology and Distance Learning list. At the time Barry didn't know how to edit video, and was discovering that two cameras are needed for good classroom video—one focused on the students—and that capturing sound in a classroom can be a problem. But Barry proved that teachers could make useful classroom videos for professional development, and that it didn't take a lot of expensive equipment.

A few years ago I was asked by CALPRO in California to help put some of their successful face-to-face adult education workshops in an online PD format, using Blackboard. I realized as I did this work how much more interesting the online version could be with graphics and video. I discovered, however, that there were very few adult education videos, fewer still that could be used as content in someone else's online course. I thought a video PD library of classroom videos might be useful to those designing online PD.

Finally, in my own graduate education program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, I had participated in something called "micro-teaching", live video recording of our short, prepared lessons, used as feedback and discussion starters to help us think about how effectively we were (or weren't) using specific learning objectives, methods and kinds of content.

All these have influenced our work at MLoTS.org and each I think is a worthy topic for this discussion. Here are some questions that might resonate with some of those participating in this discussion.

  1. If you are a teacher, do you want to see what other teachers do in their classrooms? What would you like to see? What do you hope to learn from looking at these videos?
  1. Can a set of well-prepared videos introduce teachers to new standards or methods for teaching and learning in a way that just reading about the standards and methods cannot?
  1. Should teachers be encouraged to make videos of their own—and their colleagues'—teaching? If so, what training do they need to do this well? What equipment to they need? Should they edit them, too? How should the videos be used?
  1. Should The U.S. Department of Education sponsor and make available—at no charge—high quality classroom videos that could be used in face-to-face or online courses? Should state PD centers do this? Should some other organization support this? If so, which one(s)?
  1. Is micro-teaching used in adult basic education? Should it be? Is it a good way to do intensive PD, especially for new teachers?

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

djrosen123 at gmail.com


Subject: [PD 5808] Introductions
From: Fearnow, Sarah
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

My name is Sarah Fearnow. I am a GED instructor and coach for math teachers for Pima College Adult Education. I lead monthly meetings of a professional learning community of 15 math teachers. I have used videos I have created with my learning community and would like more guidance in strategies for using videos effectively for teacher professional development.

Sarah Fearnow


Subject: [PD 5810] Why use video for adult education professional development?
From: Betsy L. Parrish
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

I’d like to share a few things we have been doing that relate to David’s questions:

My colleagues and I use video clips extensively for PD and courses for ABE and ESL teachers. So many teachers/programs are stretched and won’t give teachers release time to observe others. Video is such a great way to take teachers into a variety of classes, especially for teachers working in rural areas who are isolated from other teachers. I have drawn from David MLoTS, Heide Wrigley’s reading demonstration, and some of the commercial training videos.

More recently, we have been using the New American Horizons (www.newamericanhorizons.org) videos I have had the privilege of working on over the past two years. These are freely accessible online for PD providers, teacher educators and classroom teachers. They can even be streamed into online courses. While the focus is on Adult ESL instruction, GED and even secondary teachers have found them helpful. When working with any videos, I see it as an opportunity to observe how learners react to various practices, i.e. what is the impact of various teaching practices on learner outcomes (not a how-to on teaching).

For example, I have teachers script the questions a teacher asks and the learners’ answers, then analyze which types of questions generate the most critical thinking on the part of learners.

In response to David’s questions:

Can a set of well-prepared videos introduce teachers to new standards or methods for teaching and learning in a way that just reading about the standards and methods cannot?

Absolutely. I find that participants in PD and courses are far better able to translate theory into practice when they see it in action. One thing that is key to good videos is to include reflections from the teacher in the video to get a sense of what goes into making decisions in a lesson.

We use a clinical approach in our certificate program whereby peers observe one another teaching ESL at an adult education center. While a pair of teachers team teaches, the others observe using observation tasks. The observations are highly focused on observing the learning that is happening, not the teachers’ performance. We use the videos above for practice with the whole observation process before they go out to student teach.

Should teachers be encouraged to make videos of their ownand their colleagues'teaching?


We are thinking of doing distant peer-mentoring for out-state teachers. We’d have them videotape themselves, post the clips on Digital Dropbox, and then observe one another. I wonder about permissions from learners for something like this. Has anyone tried that?

I am eager to hear what others are doing.

Betsy Parrish

TEFL/Adult ESL Certificate Programs

Hamline University


Subject: [PD 5811] Using Video for Staff Development
From: Jameelah R. Wright
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

I have used video in workshops I've presented, and I have also been to professional development workshops where video have been used. I think they're an excellent way to emphasize a point and to show work in action. I can also appreciate that video address the visual learning style, because no one wants to be lectured or talked to death during a workshop!

Jameelah R. Wright

Professional Development Coordinator

Three Stages Child Care and Learning Center


Subject: [PD 5823] Re: Using Video for Staff Development
From: Bonnie Odiorne
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Yes, but beware of videos that lecture or talk to death :-).

Bonnie

Bonnie Odiorne, PhD Director, Writing Center Adjunct Professor of English,

French, First Year Transitions, Day Division and ADP

Post University, Waterbury, CT

Labyrinth Facilitator, Spiritual Director


Subject: [PD 5812] Re: Using Video for Staff Development
From: Jameelah R. Wright
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

When I first began teaching, daily I would stroll into other teachers’ classrooms to "borrow" ideas on room arrangement, classroom management, activities, etc. Visiting other classrooms is definitely an excellent way to develop professionally, and it something that I recommend to all the new teachers that I mentor.

Video is a great way to introduce new standards and methods of teaching and learning because it addresses that visual aspect of learning. A lot of people have a hard time remembering things they learn aurally, and video one way to help learners get that picture of the point you're making.

Teachers should certainly be encouraged to make videos of their own teaching. One of the things I do with the teachers I mentor is videotape them in action, then I make them watch it. We discuss what they saw, what they feel they did right, and what they might want to change about a particular aspect of their teaching. It's a bit weird to watch yourself at first, but it is very beneficial to your growth and development as an effective educator.

In New Jersey, micro-teaching is used in both traditional route and alternate route teacher education classes. I'm not sure if I would consider it intensive PD, but it definitely is beneficial for veteran and novice teachers alike. It's another way to share our practice and to develop our craft even further.

Jameelah R. Wright

Professional Development Coordinator

Three Stages Child Care and Learning Center


Subject: [PD 5818] Re: Uses of video of teachers and of students
From: Val Yule
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Jameelah gives many good ideas. One that I think should be incorporated into all teacher-training is: …videotape them in action, then I make them watch it. We discuss what they saw, what they feel they did right, and what they might want to change about a particular aspect of their teaching. It's a bit weird to watch yourself at first, but it is very beneficial to your growth and development as an effective educator.

This is also good for students with learning or social problems—to be able to watch themselves in action afterwards on video! But do not watch it with them—they will benefit most by watching by themselves.

Val Yule


Subject: [PD 5817] How we use Video for Staff Development
From: Maria Dien
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

How are staff developers using video in professional development? How do you use video in your online or face-to-face PD workshops or courses?

When I taught at UNAM, a colleague and I invited a guest speaker to facilitate a workshop via Skype, for an international group of teachers. The speaker had uploaded audio files prior to the training, which she played and then discussed with the teachers during this online "workshop". The topic of the webcast involved how to teach Reductions (i.e. gonna/wanna/shoulda) for listening and pronunciation activities. Per student reviews and the level of participation during the workshop, the students (i.e. teachers) found the training to be very engaging and useful!

Have you ever used video as a professional development tool in your program? If so, how did your group review and process the video in order to share thoughts, give feedback and get the maximum benefit? How did teachers receive this?


Yes. That same group of visiting teachers was fortunate enough to participate in one of OTAN's webinars concerning online tools for building literacy. Many thanks and cheers to Branka at OTAN for allowing us attend her interesting and pragmatic webinar! The students took notes during the webinar and they were able to access online resources and links via the PPT recap, which was posted by Branka the following day.

Next, the teachers were divided into groups where they explored and researched one of the sites for 30 minutes. Then they presented their ideas on how they could/would use the material with their students.


The link to that webinar is:

http://timac.wikispaces.com/OTANforLibraryLiteracyPrograms

Additionally, another colleague and I are thinking about doing a mini-workshop (staff development workshop regarding how to teach English with movies). Among other ideas, we will brainstorm with the class about the types of things that can be taught with movies, and for a “warmer,” the students (i.e. teachers) will watch a brief movie clip and discuss in small groups how and what they might be able to teach with that movie clip.

After a wrap-up with that warmer, we will show them some sample lessons and some lessons other teachers have developed using videos and /or movies. For example:

Finding Nemo: Vocabulary Activity: © Eleanor Kettle 2006. Retrieved at www.ESLmovies.com:

http://www.eslmovies.com/Attachments/12_FN%20Vocab%20Activity.pdf

Finding Nemo: Roleplays/Discussion © Eleanor Kettle 2006. Retrieved at www.ESLmovies.com

http://www.eslmovies.com/Attachments/12_FN%20Viewing%20Activity.pdf

ESL Videos: "We are New York"; a site complete with transcripts and lesson plans, gratis...

http://www.nyc.gov/html/weareny/html/videos/videos.shtml

Next, we will show them a series of specific techniques for teaching with movies and have them develop an activity for another film clip.

Cheers,


Maria Dien


Subject: [PD 5819] Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development: How We use Video Online for Staff Development
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Betsy, Maria, Jameelah, Marian and others,

I would be very interested to hear what you think the differences are—both the opportunities and challenges—of using PD videos online versus using them in face-to-face PD. Tomorrow and Thursday we will look at and discuss some videos online here in this discussion. We could have done that at a face-to-face conference. Other than accessibility—not everyone can go to face-to-face PD—are there other advantages to doing this online? Is the dialogue more reflective because people reflect before they write? Is having several days to think about the topic better than having one hour at a conference? Are there other advantages?

I have done workshops at state and national conferences in which I have shown PD videos. (One of these, on numeracy, was video recorded by my MLoTs videographer colleague, Owen Hartford, at the Massachusetts Coalition for Adult Education's Network conference in 2008. You can see it at http://mlots.org/abby/abbypage.htmlby clicking on the image in the bottom right.)

In these workshops I break the large group into several smaller groups, explain what the topic of the video recorded lesson will be, and ask teachers to discuss in their groups how they would approach teaching the topic, what they would hope to learn from seeing another teacher teach this. Then I show the video. After the video they take notes on what they saw: observations, questions, reflections; then they discuss these. I can usually show two different video-recorded lessons in a one-hour or 90-minute workshop. The discussions are always lively and teachers say the workshop is engaging. In the evaluation of the workshop they also say they want to know more about the context of the lesson, what happened in the lessons leading up to and following it. Sometimes they want to know where they can learn more about the approach the teacher uses.

However, I don't know what this process looks and feels like online. If you have shown PD videos online with teachers, what was that experience like for them? For you as a professional developer?

One observation frequently made by teachers in the face-to-face workshops I have done is that the MLoTS videos I show are not necessarily "best practice". (The lessons we have video recorded so far have, in my opinion, have ranged from okay to excellent.) Watching these videos is a different experience from watching a PD video series in which master teachers, using state-of-the-art curriculum and methods are demonstrating how to use the curriculum, approach and/or methods. These are two different PD models.

The first model I would call Nonformal Peer-to-peer Observation and Reflection ("Window on a Classroom" for short). Teachers look at their own practice in comparison with another teacher's practice. They see things they like and don't like. In their reflections they say things like "I like the way I teach this better than her approach," or "I hadn't thought of doing it that way. I am going to try that." or "I wish I could talk to her and ask her about....."

The second model I would call Formal Best Practices PD ("Teacher Training" for short). While reflection and discussion is important in both models, in the "best practices" model there is a specific well-articulated approach, often now based on evidence of what works; specific curriculum materials that were designed for that approach; and a specific set of teaching practices to be learned, practiced, and improved.

I hope this distinction will be useful in our discussion here.

For everyone who participates in looking at and discussing the videos tomorrow and Wednesday, please note your thoughts throughout the process and share them with us. I am eager to learn how this online PD experience compares with a face-to-face viewing of videos.

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

Media Library of Teaching Skills

djrosen at mlots.org
http://mlots.org


Subject: [PD 5822] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development: How We use Video Online for Staff Development
From: Bonnie Odiorne
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

In my experience with asynchronous online education, there are two things that would help PD, IMHO. 'E-presence', where we project our personalities as teachers into our writing, and then just the habit of following the threads that we pick up here, where we're not necessarily reading responses in the order in which the are presented, and are comfortable with the 'cloud' (not the online kind) of ideas floating around. And, yes, because we answer in our own time and take time to respond, we can comment, and it seems to me ultimately the order doesn't matter; small-group breakout may or may not make sense asynchronously, unless different groups were to report on different videos. Those not used to PD list serves might have a bit more trouble or asynchronous e-learning might have a bit more trouble.

Best,

Bonnie

Bonnie Odiorne, PhD Director, Writing Center Adjunct Professor of English,

French, First Year Transitions, Day Division and ADP

Post University, Waterbury, CT

Labyrinth Facilitator, Spiritual Director


Subject: [PD 5824] Uses of video of teachers and of students—heard but not seen
From: Isserlis, Janet
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

A million years ago, when the technology became available, Jennie Crooks, a very wise colleague taped many of my classes. She seldom had the camera on me, but heaven knows one knew I was there. I learned a LOT about teacher talk, about the fact that I tend to teach to the left (physically, really). When reviewing the tapes, I saw entire sections of the room that I tended not to look at, saw what learners were doing while I wasn't always looking their way.

I learned and continue to learn much.

Students like seeing the tapes a month later, too—they could often see their own progress.

(My apologies if someone's mentioned this strategy already; I’m trying to catch up.)

Janet Isserlis


Subject: [PD 5841] Re: Use of video as a PD Tool (Abigail Penny)
From: Abby Penny
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hello All,

I'm a little late in responding but here are my thoughts.

  1. I agree with Marian Thacher that it's hard to find time and funding for teachers to observe each other, and so video makes complete sense though I believe too that there's no substitute for actually seeing it in action in person.
  1. I watched one of the videos on OTAN (the one about the 5-Paragraph essay) and it was very helpful! Therefore, for me, YES, 5 minutes is long enough to get the idea of a teaching concept or strategy, assuming it's not very complicated.
  1. When I was teaching adult ESL in rural Nevada, we couldn't easily visit other teachers. Therefore our site Administrator asked us how we wanted to go about PD. One way is that we attended the adult education conference together, and we met once a week for a PLC on a pre-determined topic. For our PLC meetings that we had this past spring, we collaborated with our host-site in Elko, NV, and this required using Interactive Video so that all of us in Winnemucca could meet with all the teachers in Elko at the same time. It wasn't ideal but it worked.
  1. In the last program I was with, we were encouraged to look at online videos as a professional development tool but we didn't go any group review, give feedback, etc. though this sounds like it'd be great!
  1. What is video best at? You can watch it when you have time, and can watch it over and over. What can video do that no other medium can do as well? Maybe it gives you a sense of being there but not being in the way?... How effective of a staff development tool is it or can it be? It seems to me it can be an effective tool for staff development for those who cannot meet in person. However, I don't think it's as good as in-person meeting, shadowing, etcetera, except for the fact that you can view a video over and over whereas when seeing someone give a lesson live, in person, you can't view it over and over (unless you record it for yourself). How do we know what's effective? By asking, polling...

Now to answer Professor Rosen's questions.

  1. If you are a teacher, do you want to see what other teachers do in their classrooms? Absolutely!
  1. What would you like to see? A variety of lesson plans on different topics and in different stages – the planning beforehand, the lesson itself, the teachers’ self-evaluation afterward.
  1. What do you hope to learn from looking at these videos? Ideas to use in my classroom and I hope to gain an idea of what might help me be a more effective efficient teacher. I’m also curious what the demographics are of other teachers’ classes. 
  1. Can a set of well-prepared videos introduce teachers to new standards or methods for teaching and learning in a way that just reading about the standards and methods cannot? Yes, I believe so, though I wouldn’t want to have just video and no written material to read through to supplement the video. For me, I need both – video and reading material.
  1. Should teachers be encouraged to make videos of their ownand their colleagues'teaching? Yes, if they have permission of course.
  1. If so, what training do they need to do this well? What to film, what not to film, what factors to think of in terms of how to film, where to set up the camera, etcetera.
  1. What equipment to they need? Filming camera, maybe editing tools on computer…?
  1. Should they edit them, too? Maybe to a point…
  1. How should the videos be used? They should be used as PD tools for other teachers, but also for the teacher filmed to review what she/he looks like when teaching to be able to reflect and adjust if necessary.
  1. Should The U.S. Department of Education sponsor and make availableat no chargehigh quality classroom videos that could be used in face-to-face or online courses? Why not?!?
  1. Should state PD centers do this? If possible.  
  1. Should some other organization support this? If possible.
  1. If so, which one(s)? One idea that comes to mind is the NNRPDP—Northeastern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program (www.nnrpdp.org).
  1. Is micro-teaching used in adult basic education? I’m not sure I understand what this is…

Abby Penny


Subject: [PD 5845] Re: Use of video as a PD Tool (Abigail Penny)
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Abby, you go, girl! I think you answered every question! It sounds to me like we are agreeing that watching videos alone with no context or follow up is not the ideal, but it's better than nothing. Ideally we would have pre-activities, post-activities, group discussion, application in our classroom, and then follow up.

We haven't really talked about interactive video or video chat as a tool for PD, but it certainly is one. Although there is no substitute for actually being together (we are herd animals, after all), video provides both the voice and the visual signals that help us feel like we are getting to know someone. If I meet Wendy at a conference, I will feel like I have already interacted with her. That's important to me because I'm a relater—I will learn more from you if I can identify with you or relate to you in some way. So I will look for Wendy and look forward to what else she has to say. It's hard to relate with just a voice and slides, for example, though not impossible.

I think that's why the TED videos (http://www.ted.com/) are so effective. They showcase amazing ideas, AND you get to see the normal-looking person who has the amazing idea.

OTAN has tried some video chats via our online meeting software. Branka can say more about this, but I think of it as fun but fraught with technical challenges. My thought is that it would work better for a group that already knows each other, but I don't have evidence for that. Anyone have experience with video chat for PD that they would like to add?

David, regarding sharing video online vs. face-to-face, I believe face-to-face is always better if it's an option. But often it's not. So online sharing is the next best thing, and has its own advantages like being able to watch more than once, and at odd times, as Kristi pointed out. In these days of shrinking budgets and no travel money, video is getting more attention. It’s also gotten so much easier to produce and post.

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD


Subject: [PD 5848] Re: Use of video as a PD Tool (Abigail Penny)
From: Barbara Allaire
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Greetings,

Responding to Abby's and others' interest in having videos of a variety of lesson plans on different topics, with reflections on their work by the teachers, I want to let you know of a resource that has been developed in the past year. I know that the emphasis in these discussions has been on short clips that demonstrate a technique, and the MLoTS example by Wendy Quinones does that very well. But the intent of the videos in the series "Teaching ESL to Adults: Classroom Approaches in Action" is to present the unfolding of planned lessons that include many strategies around a single subject.

The eight videos in the series were professionally produced by the New American Horizons Foundation, a non-profit that is making them available online for free. Three DVDs of the series can also be obtained for a nominal charge for materials. For information, see www.newamericanhorizons.org. (Full disclosure: I’m the Foundation’s director.) Betsy Parrish and MaryAnn Florez are the adult ESL consultants on the project.

The videos were intended to capture the essence and flow of a whole two-hour lesson, condensed into a half-hour video, with the teacher's reflections on the lesson interspersed with the classroom footage. They deal with a variety of subjects at different learner levels. It is similar to having teachers visit other teachers’ classrooms, with the added variable that these teachers were selected because of their effective teaching using best practices. That’s not to say that they are perfect or that you can’t differ with some of their approaches, but the videos attempt to demonstrate good teaching in a whole lesson.

These videos are being used in a variety of online training and face-to-face PD workshop settings. In workshops, they are often presented in segments, with discussion on each part of the lesson. At this point there are no accompanying print materials; we hope that will come in time, but we wanted to get the videos produced first and see the creative ways that PD people and individuals who want to enhance their teaching skills will use them.

Barbara Allaire

New American Horizons Foundation

barbara.allaire at gmail.com

Subject: [PD 5865] Re: Using Video for Staff Development
From: Piracha, Janet
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

A very good site for reflection, commentary and discussion—Adult ESL training videos: Classroom approaches in action from New American Horizons, can be viewed online, downloaded, or you can order DVD’s…http://www.newamericanhorizons.org/blog/outline-for-video-series .

Janet Piracha

NE SABES Assistant Director/Curriculum and Assessment Coordinator

Northern Essex Community College

Lawrence, MA


Subject: [PD 5884] Re: Use of video as a PD Tool (Abigail Penny)
From: Susan Kidd
Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011

I have used interactive TV for professional development with colleges that have branch campuses that are quite distant. It's a challenge, and sometimes it works better than others. In one incidence, we tested all the connections the day before, and then there was a huge windstorm that knocked out the ITV towers. One of the distant sites had to connect to the main campus via cell phone. Fortunately, I'd sent my PowerPoint and all handouts ahead.

Here is a brief protocol that helps me when I set up ITV workshops and/or meetings:

Professional Development using ITV

  • Each site will have a cohort of participants
  • An onsite facilitator for each site with technical knowledge
  • E-mail all handouts, sign-in sheets and evaluations to onsite facilitators
    • color key in footer for easy identification
    • number all handouts in the order in which they will be distributed (begin with 01 so that computer sorts in correct order)
    • Organize handouts into "individual packets" and "group work" - write clear directions for onsite facilitators about when to distribute handouts for group activities
  • Onsite facilitators prepare handouts with clear instructions from overall facilitator
  • Pre-test ITV
    • Facilitator and participants can be seen and heard at all sites
    • Power Point presentations can be easily viewed at all sites
    • Easily switch between ppt. view and facilitator view
    • Send copy of ppt. to remote sites with clear directions about when to proceed from one slide to the next
    • Walk through all handouts and activities with onsite facilitators
  • Have speaker phone as back-up in case of problems with ITV connection
  • Facilitator has list of all sites and participants at each site
  • Start with introductions - all participants at all sites
  • Treat sites equally
  • During activities, alternate site input - keep checklist
    • Do not have every group at every site report back on each activity - alternate
  • Keep checking in with all participants at all sites
  • Provide immediate feedback loop
  • Have cell phones available and make sure each site has other contact numbers in case of technical problems
  • Observe "rules" for workshops regarding
    • Cell phones (except for emergency contact with technical problems)
    • Breaks
    • Side-bar conversations (these are at least as annoying in ITV as in f-2-f!)
  • Mute mikes when not speaking

My office is about 200 miles from the state office for adult education, so I routinely use ITV for meetings. Many of the same criteria apply in that situation.

Susan

Susan Kidd

State Board for Community & Technical Colleges - ABE



Videos of Students Learning

Subject: [PD 5809] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Susan Kidd
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

I have found, as many of you have already stated, that teachers who often work in isolation, want a chance to observe other teachers, and video is one way of accomplishing this. Beyond this use, I've used videos of students as a way to do professional development (PD) about assessment. Good video clips of students transparently grappling with concepts are extremely useful. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find many videos of student performance that don't also include teaching. I think there is a huge need for more resources like this—especially videos of adult learners.

Susan

Susan Kidd

State Board for Community & Technical Colleges - ABE


Subject: [PD 5814] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Susan,

This is an excellent idea, to video students transparently grappling with concepts. In an MLoTS video on ratio and proportion, http://mlots.org/abby/abbypage.html the teacher, Abby Magee, patiently waits for students to figure out the answer to the problem she has posed. You can almost see the learners' thinking gears turn. I would love to see (or to help make) videos of student learning where direct instruction is not featured, but where a teacher has set up the lesson so that learners can use good discovery and problem solving strategies, linking what they already know, and pushing this into a new context to solve a new problem.

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

djrosen123 at gmail.com


Subject: [PD 5837] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development —what's your experience?
From: Susan Kidd
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

David,

I would love it if MLoTS could develop such videos. I was searching for videos of students reading aloud which would show them grappling with comprehension, vocabulary, etc. After searching all the education specific sites (including MLoTS), I stumbled on YouTube videos of people reading Twilight. It took some searching, but I finally found two that I could use.

Susan Kidd


Subject: [PD 5842] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Branka Marceta
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Susan,

I would love to see the two YouTube videos with people reading Twilight. Can you share the links with us, please?

~Branka Marceta


P.S. I think I belong to camp Jacob. :-)


Subject: [PD 5885] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Susan Kidd
Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Here are the links:

I'd love to hear reactions.

Susan

Susan Kidd

State Board for Community & Technical Colleges - ABE


Subject: [PD 5886] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—YouTube Twilight
From: Branka Marceta
Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Hi Susan,

I enjoyed the videos of young people reading Twilight books.

In http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pZ95mrQgUc&feature=related

I like the way gayle1248 is being analytical and critical about the situation in the part she was reading and her interpretation of a relationship between the main characters. In the other two videos she created she also talks about first person narrative technique and how successful character building is in the book, in her opinion, and supports it with examples from the book.

In http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcCfwHbaKH8&feature=related

I like the way man1d2tran is presenting the elements of the book—the title, the author, the contents, the dedication and then explains the origin and implies its symbolism. BTW, it looks like he's an actor. He's got a profile on IMDB.

I think these videos are great examples to use for modeling reading strategies for students.

~Branka Marceta, OTAN



Day Two: Considerations for Using Video in Professional Development

Subject: [PD 5821] Day 2: Considerations for Using Video for PD
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Dear PD List,

Thanks to everyone for the lively discussions on Using Video in Staff Development! I've compiled the posts from Monday on the ALE Wiki if you'd like to catch up on the conversation.

Visit: http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Using_Video_in_Teaching_and_Professional_Development

(Click on "Experiences Using Video for PD" in the right-hand box.)

Don't forget to view either of these videos for discussion on Wednesday and Thursday:

    • "Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary" (27% of the vote)
      http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html (Note: This is a series of three video segments from MLoTS, 3 min, 5 min, and 5 min each, please view all three.)

I see that we've already begun discussion of considerations for using video, such as "What is the most appropriate length for a video to be used for professional development?"

Please feel free to continue discussions from yesterday. In addition, what are further considerations for teachers in accessing and benefiting from the use of video for professional development? How are staff developers addressing these issues?

Share your questions, insights, and concerns today.

Thanks,

Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5826] Fwd: Re: Day 2: Considerations for Using Video for PD
From: Branka Marceta
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Hello Jackie and colleagues participating in the discussion on our day 2,

1. Thank you for the wiki

I'd like to thank Jackie for organizing our content on the wiki. It must take a lot of your time. It sooo works for the way I process information. Instead of going through each e-mail message, I can go to the wiki and find the same info on one page for each day of the week.
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Experiences_Using_Video_for_PD

I can also refer to the big picture on the home page of our discussion.
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Using_Video_in_Teaching_and_Professional_Development

Also thank you to David Rosen for starting the ALE wiki and working tirelessly to keep it going.
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Main_Page

2. What are further considerations for teachers in accessing and benefiting from the use of video for professional development? How are staff developers addressing these issues?

Our discussion on Day 1 has covered (IMHO) many aspects of using video for PD, such as:

  • What is the appropriate length and in what situations?
  • What pre, during and post viewing activities can teachers engage in?
  • What are the differences between using videos in PD in F2F (face-to-face) compared to online situations?
  • What are the differences in the contexts—is the video about informal peer observation or about subject matter expert delivering best practices?

For Day 2 I'd like to share a few thoughts I have about further considerations on:

The quality of the video capture and production:

  • It is difficult to capture good quality audio with most of the consumer equipment and poor quality audio affects the comprehension significantly
  • The lighting and the composition in the frame have an impact, too
  • Once filmed, how much editing does it take (We, at OTAN, spend an average of 3 days shooting and a few weeks editing a video, and we have a professional videographer as a part of our staff. How many teachers and staff developers have the time and resources to film and edit videos on a regular basis, or even once in a while? I applaud teachers like Barry Burket and Wendy Quinnones, and all the others in the MLoTS library for doing so.)

Content and sharing:

  • Should and could the videos be created locally, even at the program level, and engage teachers in a certain topic?
  • Should and could the videos be created on a needs-basis as instructional issues arise?

How videos can be presented and distributed:

  • MLoTS has done a great job of collecting what resources exist already;
  • OTAN's had video production as a part of it's contract deliverables for the state of California; and
  • Literacywork and their Bright Ideas curriculum are another example of a useful collection of PD videos.

Questions:

  • Can there be a dedicated channel on various video-sharing services such as YouTube, TeacherTube, Vimeo and others, a dedicated channel or agreed upon tag so that we can all easily find each other's videos?
  • Can there, ideally, be a national level effort to bring together collections and various other efforts by adult educators in this area of video in PD?

These are just a few thoughts.

Branka Marceta, OTAN

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I:
Using Videos for Instructor PD


Subject: [PD 5829] Re: Fwd: Re: Day 2: Considerations for Using Video for PD
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hello Branka, and others,

Branka,thanks for your thoughtful post. Please see my comments interspersed below.

On Jul 26, 2011, at 2:01 PM, Branka Marceta wrote:

Hello Jackie and colleagues participating in the discussion on our day 2,

  1. Thank you for the wiki 

I'd like to thank Jackie for organizing our content on the wiki. It must take a lot of your time. It sooo works for the way I process information. Instead of going through each e-mail message, I can go to the wiki and find the same info on one page for each day of the week.
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Experiences_Using_Video_for_PD

From David: Having this discussion recorded on the ALE Wiki—day-by-day—is terrific. Thanks to Jackie for doing this. In addition to the ALE Wiki PD topic area, there is also a technology area, at http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Technology . Using Video in the Classroom is a topic that I have just added, at http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Using_Video_in_the_Classroom . It includes a link to Tips for Making Videos with Students, http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Making_videos_with_students . I would like to invite those in this discussion, and in the subsequent discussion on the Technology discussion list next month, to add to that area on the ALE Wiki. You will find simple wiki instructions at the bottom of the Technology page.

2. What are further considerations for teachers in accessing and benefiting from the use of video for professional development? How are staff developers addressing these issues?

Our discussion on Day 1 has covered (IMHO) many aspects of using video for PD, such as:

  • What is the appropriate length and in what situations?
  • What pre, during and post viewing activities can teachers engage in?

From David: I haven't heard enough yet about this. Anyone given this thought?

  • What are the differences between using videos in PD in F2F (face-to-face) compared to online situations?
  • What are the differences in the contexts—is the video about [nonformal] peer observation or about subject matter expert delivering best practices?

From David: Is this a useful distinction? Do we need more of one kind, more of both?

For Day 2 I'd like to share a few thoughts I have about further considerations on:

The quality of the video capture and production:

  • It is difficult to capture good quality audio with most of the consumer equipment and poor quality audio affects the comprehension significantly

From David: Branka from our experience at the MLoTS, this is the number one tech consideration. Viewers want to hear the teacher and the students in the video. In MLoTS videos we always use at least two microphones, a wireless lapel mic for the teacher and wired mics for groups of students. Because we video only authentic learning situations sometimes the (for example older, New England) classrooms have high ceilings and echo-y classrooms, so it's important to get the wired mics close to the students. (Perhaps MLoTS videographer, Owen Hartford has other thoughts on this.) Branka, what are your strategies to capture sound in the OTAN videos?

  • The lighting and the composition in the frame have an impact, too

From David: We use natural light if possible to avoid being intrusive. In one recent video (the Five-Paragraph Essay) we video recorded in winter, beginning in the late afternoon. We realized that the sun would go down while we were shooting so we just pulled down the classroom shades at the beginning. Some classroom video-recording is just problem-solving on the spot. However, training and experience are important, too. Branka and other videographers here, what are your strategies for getting good light?

  • Once filmed, how much editing does it take (We, at OTAN, spend an average of 3 days shooting and a few weeks editing a video, and we have a professional videographer as a part of our staff. How many teachers and staff developers have the time and resources to film and edit videos on a regular basis, or even once in a while? I applaud teachers like Barry Burket and Wendy Quinnones, and all the others in the MLoTS library for doing so.)

From David: The editing always takes the most time. Just to clarify, when we video record classrooms, our videographer, Owen Hartford, does all the editing. We also have a project design where we will train teachers to do the video recording but we will still do the editing. Editing requires skills, time and interest that most teachers do not have.

Content and sharing:

  • Should and could the videos be created locally, even at the program level, and engage teachers in a certain topic?

From David: I would like to hear from people who are interested in making PD videos locally or at the state level. What is needed? How would you go about it?

  • Should and could the videos be created on a needs-basis as instructional issues arise?

How videos can be presented and distributed:

  • MLoTS has done a great job of collecting what resources exist already;
  • OTAN's had video production as a part of it's contract deliverables for the state of California; and
  • Literacywork and their Bright Ideas curriculum are another example of a useful collection of PD videos. 

Questions:

  • Can there be a dedicated channel on various video-sharing services such as YouTube, TeacherTube, Vimeo and others, a dedicated channel or agreed upon tag so that we can all easily find each other's videos? 

From David: I hope the MLoTS does this now. If there are any adult education classroom videos useful for PD that are _not_ linked on MLoTS, please let me know about them. We prefer to link to videos that are already on the web but in some cases we have, with permission, hosted others' videos on our web site. Thanks, incidentally, to Marian Thacher at OTAN for hosting the Captured Wisdom videos made at NCAL. There are so few adult education PD videos that we cannot let any good ones disappear!

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

Media Library of Teaching Skills

djrosen at mlots.org
http://mlots.org


Subject: [PD 5830] Re: Day 2
From: Kris Witte
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hello all,

This discussion is all good information for my Online Teaching and Learning graduate Certificate at NMSU.

The video on cell phone use in PD or teaching brings to mind a concept that I intend to explore: "flipping the classroom": http://diigo.com/0ill3.

Kris Witte

Vice President, Public Services Alliance (501c3)

kmwitte1 at msn.com

IM: Nmkris (Skype)

My wiki: http://mlearn-examples.wikispaces.com/

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/kris-witte/6/199/4b


 


Length of Video

Subject: [PD 5804] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Michele Brannon-Hamilton
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Hi Everyone,

Sometimes I use short videos from the Common Craft Show (http://www.commoncraft.com) when I teach people how to use new software or collaboration tools. I find they enhance face-to-face instruction by providing an overview of what I'm teaching. They're short and to the point. I hope to create something similar in the future using video software like Camtasia which I downloaded and used for 30 days free. I think the key to using video is keep it short and relevant, nothing fancy.

Michele Brannon-Hamilton

eLearning Resource Consultant


Subject: [PD 5807] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience?
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Mon Jul 25 15:50:41 EDT 2011

I like your point about the length, Michele. The feedback we get from our advisory group is try to keep it to 5 minutes or less, especially if it's something that teachers or users will watch independently. Do others agree with that? Is five minutes long enough to get the idea of a teaching concept or strategy?

I also agree that Common Craft videos are wonderful. We have used several, including this one on Wikis in Plain English. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dnL00TdmLY, it's on YouTube, so apologies if you have it blocked at your site.)

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD  


Subject: [PD 5816] Re:Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience
From: Betsy L. Parrish
Date: Monday, July 25, 2011

Marion wrote: The feedback we get from our advisory group is try to keep it to 5 minutes or less, especially if it's something that teachers or users will watch independently. Do others agree with that? Is 5 minutes long enough to get the idea of a teaching concept or strategy?

I respectively disagree with your advisory group. There may be times when five minutes is enough, but rich teacher-learner or learner-learner exchanges often take much longer, especially if one is looking for learner outcomes. Also, a technique or strategy is part of a whole, so watching just a snippet can be less effective than seeing how it fits into a lesson. I’m eager to hear what others think.

Betsy Parrish

TEFL/Adult ESL Certificate Programs

Hamline University


Subject: [PD 5820] length of videos
From: Thompson, Duren J
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Betsy & Marian,

I think the length of the video should vary with the type and format of the PD. If I was in a 1-2 hour face to face (or webinar) type PD session, where conversation with my peers was possible, I'd want to spend less time passively watching a video. If I was engaged in a study circle, however, or had been assigned a video for homework/pre-work as a part of a longer, more intensive PD offering, I'd appreciate the opportunity to watch/observe, etc. a longer, more complex and 'complete' lesson.

Also, one could structure PD around a longer video, but stop and discuss it at 3-5 minute intervals. This could be combined with watching the longer/more complete video as homework/pre-work to a face-to-face/synchronous online training opportunity. To borrow from another example posted, a group could watch short clips of a lesson or students in order to learn how to observe/document observation, and then be assigned to watch a longer video for homework. The next 'coming together' could then discuss and compare folks' observations, refine techniques, etc.

Essentially, (IMHO) PD situations where teachers have access to converse with each other in real time should capitalize on the opportunity to discuss what they know/see/will use. Using up large chunks of this time viewing longer videos really feels to me like a waste of my precious 'synchronous' meeting time. Watching longer videos at leisure (preferably in my pjs) and then discussing them in detail with peers later (synchronously or asynchronously) would suit me much better.

Also helpful to me is has been watching high numbers of short clips on a single topic or technique all at once (with or without discussion in between). The BEST Plus assessment training and refresher materials do a good job of this, I think, bringing the role of editing into this discussion. Many 'whole lessons' inexpertly filmed (read—filmed by myself with the camera on top of a cabinet) are REALLY dull—or have long viewer 'down' times in them. Editing these lessons to be shorter, or more concise, or to highlight the technique(s) for discussion is, in my opinion, important for PD presentations to others. (Hmmm—I'll watch dull videos of myself for self-critique, but prefer not to watch those of others?) This could shorten or make more effective a longer video.

All that said, remember that today's learning world is all about customization and choice—perhaps other folks feel discussion is a poor PD tool for them—and they'd prefer not to talk with their peers—but read (or watch) expert teachers/situations/content and then contact a mentor or content expert with questions. But, in my experience, these folks are less common than the ones who want to talk with peers :)

So I vote for SHORT video clips in face-to-face/synchronous situations and LONG in more lengthy, asynchronous learning situations. But ALWAYS video watching with a specific guide for what to be looking for/examining while you watch. (Which could allow you to use the same video several times—looking for something different each time!)

Duren Thompson

Center for Literacy Studies - Creating life-long solutions!

University of Tennessee
www.cls.utk.edu  


Subject: [PD 5825] Re: Day 1: Using Video for Staff Development—what's your experience
From: Michele Brannon-Hamilton
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Thanks for the link Marian. Yes, I've used the wiki one as well. I think I've watched them all including the zombie one which is surprisingly about zombies and not a new computer program like I expected.

The Common Craft videos are so simple and effective. They range from one-and-a-half minutes to four minutes. I think anything over five minutes would be too long. I look for videos around three minutes because I read somewhere that people prefer the shorter videos.

These videos can also be found at http://www1.teachertube.com/ for anyone who can't use Youtube.

Michele Brannon-Hamilton

eLearning Resource Consultant


Subject: [PD 5827] Length of videos
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

You make a good point, Betsy. I should clarify that we were talking about short videos that introduce a topic or concept. The cell phone video that we will discuss on Thursday is an example of this. It introduces the idea* of using student cell phones in ESL instruction, rather than providing a full model of how to do it. Maybe that should be our next project!

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD  


Subject: [PD 5828] Re: length of videos
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Duren, thanks for your thoughtful response about length! When I participated in the ESL teacher training that used a lot of video, the video was broken into chunks. We would discuss a concept, answer some questions, then watch the video with some guiding questions about what to look for that we would answer after the video. We watched each part of the lesson separately - introduction, presentation, practice, evaluation, application - and that was really helpful for me as a new teacher. I didn't feel like my time was being wasted in that case. The whole process was structured well, but also it comes back to the fact that video can give you a picture of how a lesson goes better than anything else.

Another video PD project I think of is PDK, or Professional Development Kit, which was done by NCAL. They posted videos of lessons and then had teachers watch the videos and send in questions. Then they taped the original teacher answering the questions that was posted too. That was a good attempt at creating a video discussion before the days of Skype, and effective for teachers who are isolated from PD by their rural setting, their schedule, or some other circumstance.

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD  


Subject: [PD 5854] Re: length of videos
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

How long should Adult Ed PD videos be?

We have struggled with the question of how long PD videos should be on MLoTS. You will notice that some are very short, well under five minutes. Some are longer, up to 15 minutes. There is an ESOL Family Literacy series of short videos (of the same lesson) that is well over an hour (and includes an audio file of the history of the program as well.) http://mlots.org/Chelsea/chelsea.html

Some teachers like short videos, some want longer videos. Perhaps the longer video "chunked" into shorter segments is one good answer.

When we use these videos in face-to-face PD at conferences, in sessions that generally range from 50 minutes to 90 minutes, we always ask for suggestions of other videos that teachers would like to see us make, and for comments on features of current MLoTS videos. Comments tend to focus on the purposes/objectives of the lessons, what was taught that led up to the lesson, what will follow the lesson, and we often get questions that only the teacher (or students) can answer.

In response to these comments, we have tried to include: the teacher's lesson plan, in which we ask the teacher to list the intended learning outcomes and how the lesson connects to state adult education content standards; a brief teacher introduction to the lesson; and a teacher "de-briefing" after the lesson in which we ask how the teacher thought the lesson went and, if it wasn't already addressed, what will be taught next. About a year and a half ago, in response to a teacher's question at a state conference, we added a section to every video where viewers could post questions and comments, some directed to the teacher. Several of the MLoTS teachers whom we contacted graciously replied to those questions. For example, see the extensive questions and comments to numeracy teacher Elana Feder, and her replies, at http://mlots.org/Elana/Elana.html.

Earlier, when I mentioned the inspirations for MLoTS, I failed to mention one of the most important, an integrating technology in the classroom video project called "Captured Wisdom" led by Lynda Ginsburg and her colleagues at the National Center for Adult Literacy at the University of Pennsylvania. The project's purpose was to provide good examples of integrating technology in the classroom with authentic classrooms and teachers who understood how to do this well. After the videos were made project staff showed them to groups of teachers, noted and organized their questions, got responses from the teachers, and built an envelope of questions and answers around each video. The videos are available on the OTAN web site at http://www.otan.us/browse/dsp/dsp_CapturedWisdom.cfm (Note: a quick and easy registration is required.)

David J. Rosen

djrosen123 at gmail.com


Sound and Lighting

Subject: [PD 5844] Re: Day 2: About sound and lighting

From: Branka Marceta

Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hi David and all,

In an attempt to address some of the technical questions regarding creating videos (whether for PD or instruction), I'd like to refer you to a few articles in OTAN's Spring 2007 newsletter. Mark Fulmer, our videographer at the time and an excellent storyteller, gives advice and a list of resources related to conceptualizing and producing videos in education: http://www.otan.us/Training/pdfs/spring07insert.pdf

Specifically of interest are:

Also as a direct response to David:

What are your strategies to capture sound in the OTAN videos?

We use both the lapel and the built-in video camera mic (professional quality) and our videographer/editor can work with two audio channels in Final Cut Pro editing software.

Branka and other videographers here, what are your strategies for getting good light?

The only thing I know is that before filming, we, 'producers', usually put a piece of white paper in front of the camera so that it automatically calibrates for "white balance". Also, the light should be behind the camera facing the subject, and not facing the camera directly.

Branka Marceta, OTAN

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I



Follow Up Strategies for Video Professional Development

Subject: [PD 5834] Introduction...
From: Roger Downey
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Roger Downey, Instructor, Columbia Adult Education, Introduction,


I have been teaching some form of Adult or Alternative Ed. since 1987. Have been made part of an organization or shunned because of the students being taught for a good part of these years. We are the last provider of adult education in Jackson County, Michigan, specializing in high school completion.


Hey, to all. Professional Development is a very good way to let teachers know different techniques, strategies.

I have never been to a 'Video' PD but after some of the lectures we have endured it does sound intriguing. What I would ask is that I am at a loss if there is no follow up to the PD. If it is that important for us to attend, mandatorily, then would there be a follow up with the 'Video'? I find that if there isn't a follow up to a speaker then the administration really isn't behind the concept anyway. No matter how good the speaker or the video is, if there is nothing about it afterwards, it could be viewed as a waste of time, or at the most another inspirational message.

Roger Downey

Columbia Adult Education


Subject: [PD 5836] Other Models of professional Development, scratching the surface
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hello Roger, and others,


What you describe is one context for PD, often perhaps—for the reasons you describe: mandatory, tedious lectures, provided in a one-shot deal without follow-up, with no opportunity for reflection and practice, and without apparent support of administrators—one of the least effective. Fortunately, in many adult literacy education programs, and through statewide, regional or national professional development organizations much more effective models, are being used.

One model (far from the only or most widespread model, and one whose effectiveness has had limited research—might be called "organized shop talk" or "community of practice" PD. It is characterized by the following:

  1. It's voluntary.
  2. It's usually organized by a teacher, sometimes a lead teacher or other teacher who is responsible for, or takes a special interest in, program-based professional development
  3. It happens at the program or adult school, at a mutually agreed-upon time.
  4. There might be a guest speaker, but just as often it is driven by something that teachers want to read (or see in a video) and want to discuss.
  5. Someone, usually a teacher, is responsible for facilitating.
  6. Often teachers agree to meet three or four times on the same topic, sometimes with an action or set of actions to take in between or afterwards. Actions might include trying out something in the classroom, reflecting on it, and possibly discussing it at the next meeting.
  7. There are short but substantive readings (and/or videos) to discuss.
  8. There are specific discussion questions.

A Good example of this is a Study Circle, for example, those developed by the National Center for the Study for Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) several years ago and offered in various parts of the country. See http://www.googlesyndicatedsearch.com/u/NCSALL?q=study+circle&sa=NCSALL+Site+Search (There were adult education study circles for_ learners_ before there were PD study circles; and study circles of all kinds have a long history in the U.S. and in Sweden.)

Another model might be called "teacher independent learning." It is characterized by:

  • Individual teacher-driven, online or blended learning,
  • Sometimes a connection with a teacher's annual professional development plan, developed by that teacher, sometimes with approval from a supervisor,
  • A needs assessment process, sometimes self-assessment leading to some learning goals or objectives determined by the teacher,
  • A rich set of learning resources, and
  • A post-assessment, a way to know what the teacher has and hasn't mastered.

One of my favorite examples of this model, developed by Marian Thacher and others at OTAN, is Adult Ed Online, http://adultedonline.org (the "Tech Savvy?" part). It has a specific goal, to help teachers improve their skills and knowledge in integrating technology in adult basic education (including ESOL/ESL) teaching and learning. It begins with a teacher self-assessment. The teacher then is guided in developing an annual professional development plan on integrating technology, and as part of that process is led to online and face-to-face learning resources that can help the teacher meet the PD learning goal(s)/objectives.

There are other teacher-driven PD models, and of course, there are good professional developer driven models. For more on this, go to Professional Development Approaches and Methods on the ALE Wiki. For example:

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

Media Library of Teaching Skills

djrosen at mlots.org
http://mlots.org or

djrosen123 at gmail.com



Day Three: Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary

Subject: [PD 5831] Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary—PD goals & instructional approaches
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Wed Jul 27 09:09:30 EDT 2011

Good day or evening!

Thanks to those who commented on considerations for using video yesterday. We've dipped our toes in the water about it, there's much to explore. As we experience the use of video for PD this week, let's also take time later to reflect back on some considerations from the user standpoint: Things that impacted your ability to use video for staff development.

Many of you voted for "Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary"

(http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html) as your top video choice for this week's discussion. Today (Wednesday), we will discuss a few questions in advance of discussing the video itself, in order to hear more about how you teach fluency and vocabulary, and to solidify our learning goals. Please tell us your thoughts on the following questions:

What would you like to see or learn from viewing and discussing the video segments, "Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary?"

If you teach the kind of content or skills taught in the video you are about to view (http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html) what is your own teaching approach? How do you teach this? Tell us:

  • Your typical objectives for this kind of class
  • Typical kinds of materials you use
  • Typical challenges for your students

Please keep your subject lines specific and I hope to hear from you today.

Looking forward, Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5832] Day 3: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Good day or evening!

I hope you've had a chance to view the video segments on "Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary" (http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html). If you haven't viewed them yet, then please watch them now.

As you view the video segments, jot down some notes on scratch paper, things like practices you like or don't like, questions you would like to ask the teacher or students, and other questions or surprises.

Then reply to this email. Tell us, what did you notice about what Wendy did, about how she conducted the lessons? What did you notice about the students? What surprised you, if anything? What questions, if any, did the video raise for you?

Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5833] Re: Day 3: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary
From: Gretchen Bitterlin
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

After watching the video, my question is this: Isn't it important to find out what the learners know before presenting new information? Before defining the word on the board, I would have presented the word in a sentence and asked the learners what they think the targeted word means or guess what the words means. Was this a step in this technique?

Gretchen Bitterlin

San Diego Continuing Education


Subject: [PD 5835] Re: Day 3: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary
From: Peggy Baker
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

It seems to me that the value of the video lies in exactly this kind of comment/question, by providing a springboard for reflection on our own practice.

Peggy Baker

www.easlinstitute.org


Subject: [PD 5838] Re: Day 3: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hi Peggy, Gretchen, and All,

Peggy, thank you for your observation. And I hope we experience this now, on the PD List. We'll start to collectively see our successes in using video for PD as more of us post our reflections to the PD List, just as Gretchen has done (thank you, Gretchen!) and begin discussions about the videos.

All: In addition to the points Peggy and Gretchen have raised, what else stood out to you about the video segments on Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary (http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html)? What practices did you like or not like? What do you do similarly or what would you have done differently? What questions would you like to ask the teacher or students? What surprised you, if anything?

Jackie Taylor

PD List Facilitator

Jackie at jataylor.net


Subject: [PD 5839] Day 3 Responses to Video
From: Reyes, Kristi
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

First, as a teacher who frequently takes advantage of online opportunities to learn and develop professionally as well as train others in an online environment, I must say that video is the “next best thing to being there.” As a full-time teacher and mother of young children, I so appreciate any chance I can get to develop my knowledge and repertoire from the convenience of my own home at any hour of the day, with pauses (due to many interruptions) any time they are needed. My one hedge is that I feel that viewing a video alone is not sufficient for real change to take place. There needs to be some sort of introductory reading/background to the technique, or provisions of the related research, and some sort of “while watching” or follow-up/application activity or else the viewing is a passive activity, just as it would be for our students.

That said, I think videos such as the “Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary” clip are excellent resources for new teachers and those needing a refresher. The teacher, Wendy, is obviously a seasoned pro and did a knock-out job of demonstrating the technique. Quite a few years (2006, I believe) back I attended a workshop on the exact same technique at a “Meeting of the Minds” Symposium in Sacramento, CA, so I can comment on differences between learning this technique of vocabulary instruction in a F2F setting v. in a video. With that in mind, the following are my responses to the video itself:

I would have liked there to have been some sort of introduction within the video so that I could have better understood the context of the lesson. Was it a pre- or post-reading activity or was it part of a stand-alone vocabulary lesson? At what point in the lesson was the activity used? Accompanying print materials (lesson plans) are always helpful for beginning teachers or those who have that type of learning modality. This (as well as my next comment) is what was provided in the F2F workshop I mentioned above, and it really helped attendees grasp how to work the technique into their lesson planning.

I would have also liked to have seen (in text or in an introductory statement by the teacher) the steps of the process. For example, “First, students copy the target vocabulary words on index cards, and then listen to a lecture in which the instructor demonstrates meaning in sample sentences. Finally, students reply to questions using the target vocabulary in personally-relevant scenarios and in full sentences”… something like that. Then (OR), as the technique is demonstrated, subtitles could appear that signal which step is being done. Just an idea for making the video experience more engaging…

As for the students, it didn’t seem as though there were the option of not participating, given the round-table seating (love it, by the way!). However, the woman seemed a bit bored – obviously a cover for her lack of confidence. Don’t we all have one of those types in our classes more often than not?!

What happened in the lesson after what we see in this video? What were the follow-up activities? What would anyone of you reading this post do, out of curiosity, to give students more practice in using this vocabulary and developing their fluency? Perhaps the second video (part 2) shows us?

Finally, I teach advanced ESL, so of course my audience is a bit different, but one thing that bothered me a bit and that I would definitely modify, from a pedagogical standpoint (nothing to do with the video), is to have students have to respond to questions and use the vocabulary so quickly after learning it. ESL students (and others, I assume) need more time to reflect on the instruction and rehearse what they want to say in front of the group. I also have a much larger class, so that makes a difference, too, of course. What I would do in using this technique (to address these concerns as well as make it more of a communicative, interactive task for students) is to distribute a paper or project a PowerPoint slide with the questions I will ask students and give them time to write their answers and ask me for corrections on accuracy and meaning. Then I would pair up students and have them tell their sentences to partners. Last I would ask volunteers to say and/or write their answers on the board.

That’s my two cents. How about everyone else? Come on, now – it only takes a few minutes to participate in this excellent discussion! :)

Kristi Reyes

Department Chair, Noncredit ESL

Community Learning Center

Oceanside, CA


Subject: [PD 5847] Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary
From: Wendy Quinones
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hello everyone,

Wendy Quiñones here, the teacher in the vocabulary video you’ve been watching. I’ll try to tackle some of your questions.

The teaching technique you are seeing was part of a study I participated in, aimed at speeding progress for intermediate-level ABE students -- those who are at GLEs about 4 to 6, at least in my program. My group of students was at the low end of this scale. Some, as you saw, were not native speakers; several others had been in our program for years, with their progress limited by LD issues or external factors.

One of the earliest points made in our training on vocabulary teaching was to avoid engaging students in supplying word definitions before presenting the correct definition. We have all seen it: ask students to guess what a word means, and you’ll get a list of possibilities, some merely inaccurate, some absurd, and some hilarious. Which definition will students remember? Why give them the opportunity of being wrong—again? The training was quite specific about directly teaching the correct meaning of the word before there was any chance for confusion. Just as an example, a long-ago game of Fictionary gave my family the word “varve,” which to us means a specific metallic light green color. That is NOT the correct definition of the word – I no longer remember what that is – but the hilarious context in which that definition was presented is the one that stuck with us. That’s just what we don’t want to do with our students.

The next major point in the method is to allow students to bring their own context to the meaning of the words. This is the purpose of asking students to immediately use the words orally. The idea is that many voices providing different contexts provides a rich, multi-faceted understanding of the words and their usage.

Kristi Reyes has a pretty good grasp of how the vocabulary lesson worked. In the study, and now in my pre-GED class, vocabulary was a central focus, as it is one of the weakest areas for these students. Of my two classes during the week, one was then and is now devoted to vocabulary. The words may be related to a theme or may be taken from an academic word list, but vocabulary is the focus. In this method, the first step is direct instruction of the words with students making their own flashcards, followed by discussion with students trying to use the words in contexts meaningful to them. This is followed by a variety of written exercises—some matching, fill-in-the-blanks, short answers, open-ended sentence creation, and responses to reading. One of the most liberating aspects of this technique for me is the notion that target words don’t have to be contained IN readings—they can be used in questions ABOUT readings. For example, if one of the words is “significant”, we don’t have to find readings containing that word. We can use whatever reading we want, and ask questions like, “What do you think is the most significant event in this story?” Or “Does this story significantly change your thinking about …” and so on.

Applying the technique to an ESOL class would, I think, take exactly the kind of modifications that Kristi suggests. Allowing students time to write answers and receive teacher feedback, and perhaps even practice with partners, would definitely encourage student participation as well as providing lots of reinforcement for the correct use of the words.

As with most of adult ed, there is little set in stone about our teaching. We have to continually adjust to different groups of students, different settings, different purposes. My approach to vocabulary teaching has changed somewhat since the video was filmed, but I do continue to hold to the principles of direct instruction, student-provided context, and using target words to discuss readings and other classroom activities.

I hope this is helpful! I agree with all those who feel that PD without context and without follow-up is of limited effectiveness. However, with our very limited ability to observe other teachers at their work, I also think that video can be a useful tool.

Wendy


Subject: [PD 5855] More on Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Hi Everyone,

I’d like to thank Gretchen Bitterlin, Kristi Reyes, Peggy Baker, and Wendy Quiñones for sharing their reflections yesterday on the video segments on Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary (http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html). Wendy, thank you for contributing the background and context in which you taught the vocabulary lesson and for answering our questions. This has been very helpful in understanding why you used this approach and the principles to which you’ve held since.

What also stood out to me from the videos occurred in the first segment, when you connected your strategies to research findings in teaching reading to adults (the Adult Reading Component Study) and reading profiles (http://lincs.ed.gov/readingprofiles/FT_Introduction.htm) . Did anyone else notice that? What other research, specifically, speaks to the principles that Wendy demonstrated?

(I think this may also tie to the conversation about linking supplementary materials or handouts online with PD videos in general.)

I’d still like to hear from others on the Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary video segments.

For example:

  • What beliefs about teaching and learning were reinforced, changed, or broadened for you as a result of viewing these video segments (http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html) and in following this online discussion?
  • Did a new idea lead to a new question for you? Did a new question lead to a new idea? If so, tell us about it.
  • What steps might you take next?

I look forward to hearing from you,

Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5860] Vocabulary
From: Susan Jones
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

When I taught at a middle/secondary college prep school for students with LDs ("college prep" being interpreted broadly), I was very impressed in my interview that I was going to learn to teach reading comprehension... not give students practice and hope they got better at it. Our vocabulary instruction paralleled Wendy's approach.

If anybody wants some semi-organized groups of words & ideas, I've put some of the comprehension resources online and specific vocabulary ones are linked at http://www.resourceroom.net/comprehension/index.asp

A 2005 effort to make some online exercises is at http://www.resourceroom.net/vocabulary2005/di/index.html

If any of this would save somebody some prep time, it would make me happy :)


Susan Jones

Academic Development Specialist

Center for Academic Success

Parkland College

Champaign, IL


Subject: [PD 5861] Excellent Video Recommendation
From: Joy Zamierowski
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Good morning,

I have been enjoying reading the video training discussion but will admit that I am having a hard time keeping up. However, I wanted to take this opportunity to share a video with the group that Dr. Richard Gacka of the Pennsylvania Learning Differences Project shared with practitioners in our state last year. It is not a short video, but it is well worth watching, and it applies so much to what our adult education instructors do in the classroom everyday. Dr. Eric Mazur, a Harvard University Professor, shares his experiences teaching his students, who are actually prospective surgeons. He explains what he believed was teaching when he first started and how he became much more effective once he began giving the responsibility of teaching and learning to his students. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tn1DLFnbGOo


Joy Zamierowski

Pennsylvania Professional Development System

Erie, PA


PDK Video Series

Subject: [PD 5840] PDK Video series (Was video length)
From: Thompson, Duren J
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

On Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2011 Subject: [PD 5828] Re: length of videos

Marian said:

"Another video PD project I think of is PDK, or Professional Development Kit, which was done by NCAL. They posted videos of lessons and then had teachers watch the videos and send in questions. Then they taped the original teacher answering the questions that was posted too. That was a good attempt at creating a video discussion before the days of Skype, and effective for teachers who are isolated from PD by their rural setting, their schedule, or some other circumstance."

MAN, I really LIKED those PDK videos—and the web site they set up around them! Any Idea if/how we could access those online now? I know I have them on CD around here somewhere, but the site seems to be gone, gone, gone. I notice that MLoTS has a few of them up on their site...David, any info?

Duren Thompson

Center for Literacy Studies - Creating life-long solutions!

University of Tennessee
http://www.cls.utk.edu


Subject: [PD 5843] Re: PDK Video series (Was video length)
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hi Duren, and others

Dan Wagner at the University of Pennsylvania, where the PDK videos were made many years ago, gave MLoTS permission to host them. We chose to host only the ones that involved student tutor or teacher interaction. Dan might be willing to give another group permission to host all the PDK videos on a public web site. If anyone is interested, let me know and I'll give you Dan's contact information.

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

Media Library of Teaching Skills

djrosen at mlots.org
http://mlots.org or

djrosen123 at gmail.com


Subject: [PD 5852] Re: Reading: Adult Fluency and Vocabulary—PD goals & instructional approaches
From: Susan Gaer
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Video to me is an ideal way to have teacher development. I am very thankful to both MLoTS and OTAN for providing so many useful sources to improve our teaching. I am not sure if I missed this in the discussion as there have been so many emails. But are there any more out there? I see this as a very useful tool to train my teachers and would like to know where the rest of the teacher training videos online are.

Susan Gaer

Google Certified Teacher

Professor ESL, Basic Skills and Instructional Technology Coordinator

2010-2011

Santa Ana College School of Continuing Education

Email:susangaer at gmail.com

Facebook: susangaer

Skype: susangaer

twitter: @sgaer*


Subject: [PD 5853] The rest of the teacher training videos...
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Hi Susan,

As far as I know, links to _all_ the existing free and available adult education professional development videos in English can be found on MLoTS at http://mlots.org/Other_video.html . If anyone knows of a free, authentic classroom or tutoring adult ed PD video that is _not_ linked on that web page, please email me a link or whatever information you have, and we will consider adding it. Besides OTAN and MLoTS, two other notable sources of adult education videos, primarily ESOL/ESL, are: Literacywork (including a link to the CLESE videos, at http://www.literacywork.com/Literacywork.com/Welcome.html and American Horizons http://www.newamericanhorizons.org/training-videos

I wish there were more authentic adult education classroom or tutoring videos. If our field could make the resources available, there could be. Those who believe this is a priority need to communicate that at the state and national levels in the U.S.

I wonder if colleagues from other English-speaking countries such as Canada, New Zealand, Australia, the U.K., Ireland and elsewhere might let us know about adult education PD videos made in their countries. For that matter, I wonder if in other countries there is funding available to support this kind of PD activity. In the U.S. we have found it to be very limited.

David J. Rosen

Guest Discussant

Media Library of Teaching Skills

djrosen at mlots.org
http://mlots.org or

djrosen123 at gmail.com



TED Videos

Subject: [PD 5849] Re: Question about conference recordings
From: Bonnie Odiorne
Date: Wednesday, July 28, 2011

Thanks, Marian, for mentioning the TED videos. I have used them for classes when my goal is to get students interested about an issue, in chunks as writing prompts.

Bonnie

Bonnie Odiorne, PhD

Director, Writing Center,

Post University


Subject: [PD 5850] TED Video - a next generation digital book
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Wednesday, July 28, 2011

I know I'm getting off the topic here, Bonnie, but I can't resist posting this link to my current favorite TED video, about the future of the book. I show this to teachers who are thinking about how the act of reading is changing in this century. It fits into our discussion of video for PD as an example of how a video can demonstrate something you might never see or know otherwise, that can really change the way you think. (And it's not on YouTube!)

http://www.ted.com/talks/mike_matas.html

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD  



Conference Recordings on Video

Subject: [PD 5846] Question about conference recordings
From: Marian Thacher
Date: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

One thing OTAN has been doing more of is recording conference keynotes and some workshop presentations and posting them for people who can't be present. I always wonder how much these get used. I have really liked to be able to watch high profile people that I wouldn't ordinarily get to see talking about a topic that is important to me. This is especially true if it's a "breaking news" type of thing, like what is funding going to look like next year, or how will California move forward with a new state plan for adult education? But if I were in the classroom I would watch the author of a textbook I was using or a high profile author talk about their teaching suggestions, or something like that.

For example, when I was researching a technology topic (now I can't remember what it was) I came across a video of David Rosen discussing just that topic with a group of literacy professionals in Canada. That was great!

What do others think? Are there "event recordings" that have been useful to you? Do you appreciate conference proceedings being recorded, or not so much? Are there certain types of presentations or topics that should be recorded?

Marian Thacher, OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD  


Subject: [PD 5913] Conference recordings / webinar archives
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Hi Marian and All,

Marian, I've been thinking about your question from a while back about the usefulness of recording conference sessions and making them available for professional development after the event.

As the PD List Moderator, I hear from practitioners on this list and I see practitioners post on other lists about wanting conference sessions recorded and made available for those who cannot attend. I also hear a lot of requests after webinars for the link to the archived sessions. But I wonder how often these get used when they are made available. Or, does it only serve as a peace of mind, knowing these recordings are online if one ever needed the information quick.

Are these types of event recordings useful? If so, in what way(s)? Is it also just a matter of putting them online, or have others structured PD around these recorded sessions after the event?

Thanks...Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5916] Re: Conference recordings / webinar archives
From: Laurie Cozzolino
Date: Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Jackie—this is a good question.

I help manage professional development for adult education at my institution. Faculty members are always wanting us to film conferences, workshops, panels, etc., when they cannot attend or to have as archives.

While a nice idea, we sometimes forget that it takes resources (good equipment), staff (a good videographer), time (to edit and revise) and Close Captioning—a legal requirement (at least in our region). While I do find that posting PowerPoint presentations or other simple resources can be useful, I do wonder if it is worth the time and money—is it cost effective? Maybe only in specific cases where we know there will be interest and value, or, if they are, as you suggest, used to create more structured PD.

In the end, I don't know how many people ever take advantage of archived conference files/videos. It might be an interesting survey.

Laurie Cozzolino

San Diego Community College- Continuing Education Division


Subject: [PD 5918] Re: Conference recordings / webinar archives
From: Hughes, Robert
Date: Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Jackie, et al.,

A few thoughts:

We actually have a case study to help answer your question. I just checked, and the COABE session that I recorded and made available in the spring had the audio file downloaded 99 times, and the transcription we provided of the session was downloaded 126 times. Someone's finding those of value. They're still being accessed this month. And the biggest number of downloads came after you listed it as a resource on this list as part of the discussion we had on instructor certification.

The second thought I have about recording comes from being clear about what the recording is for, who will listen to it, and how it will be distributed. I've given presentations where people have expected to record my presentation and make the file available. If I have a conversation in advance of my presentation that outlines how the recording will be used, I'm usually okay with that. This past year, I showed up for a presentation where the organization didn't have that discussion with me and just expected that I would be okay with their recording and using my presentation. We eventually resolved things, but that could have challenged my relationship with that group. I recommend having some sort of written notice and/or release if anyone's planning to record and distribute. For the COABE session, we put it in the conference description, as well as in the handouts at the session; and then I included an announcement at the start of the session, and that announcement is part of the recording.

I'm actually a fan of making presentations available through audio files. I do that for all class sessions I teach, but I put the recordings in a secure place that only my students can access. In addition to providing information to people who may miss a session, it's a great universal design feature that helps people go back and listen to ideas a second time if they need/want to.

Bob H.

Bob Hughes, Ed. D.

Associate Professor of Adult Education

Seattle University

Seattle, WA


Subject: [PD 5919] Re: Conference recordings / webinar archives
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Tue Aug 9 16:32:32 EDT 2011

Thanks Bob, Laurie, All,

Yes I agree that a lot of resources go in to filming conference sessions and workshops. In the instances where I have been involved in these types of projects, I have always had a plan to use the audio or video file in a follow up piece before leaning in to the project.

(Considerations like 'How will the audio or video be used? Who will record and edit it? Whose equipment will we use? Where will it 'live'? How long will it take to finalize?' And 'How much will it cost (time, resources)?' are all important considerations to work out well in advance.)

In at least two instances on this List, we've intentionally created recordings to either serve as a springboard for a follow up discussion to a conference session, or to serve as a main resource for discussion on the PD List.

Bob, thanks for your case study - and I'm glad to hear that downloads picked up as a result of our guest discussion on teacher certification! :-) I appreciate the thought that went into the COABE recording, so that most (if not all) who attended were aware, in advance of the session, that it was being recorded. The logistics for getting signed releases to use photos, audio, or video of individuals attending conference sessions can be quite cumbersome—especially if the recording is of a plenary or other main conference event with hundreds of people attending.

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/



Flip the Classroom

Subject: [PD 5851] Re: Day3-Vocab and video tools
From: Kris Witte
Date: Wed Jul 27 22:41:49 EDT 2011

Hi all,

Great comments on how to take the video technology and apply it to excellent ESL instructional strategy!

I can imagine so many ways to "flip Wendy's classroom" to meet the needs of the students.

As an example, Wendy's presentation could be done on video and sent home for learners to digest at their own pace...rewind, fast forward.

Next, return to class and discuss the questions. As Wendy suggests "The next major point in the method is to allow students to bring their own context to the meaning of the words. This is the purpose of asking students to immediately use the words orally. The idea is that many voices providing different contexts provides a rich, multi-faceted understanding of the words and their usage."

Perhaps, another mobile learning activity would work using a tool called "voice thread" which allows learners a chance to use the words in context, without being put on the spot in class.

Voice thread link:http://diigo.com/0imdl

Kris Witte

Vice President, Public Services Alliance (501c3)

kmwitte1 at msn.com

IM: Nmkris (Skype)

My wiki: http://mlearn-examples.wikispaces.com/

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/kris-witte/6/199/4b


Subject: [PD 5867] Re: Day3-Vocab and video tools
From: Nell Eckersley
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Hi Kris and others,

You make a great point about how strategies for using video in Professional Development can be applied to using video with adult learners. In Part II of this discussion which will take place August 15-19 on the LINCS Technology and Distance Learning Discussion list, we are going to focus on using video with students, but it is always good to remind ourselves to watch for how strategies used in PD can be effective when working with students. While some folks certainly have more learning challenges then others, we are all adult learners ultimately.

Best,

Nell

Part II Discussion Announcement: Using Video with Adult Learners August 15-19, 2011
http://lincs.ed.gov/lincs/discussions/technology/11Video_part2

Description:

Join us to learn how video is being used with adult learners. While this technology has been around for some time, we will explore how the increase in access to the creation, editing, and sharing of videos through cell phone technology and social media sites like YouTube, as well as relatively inexpensive video cameras like the Flip, is making it easier and more fun to include video in instruction. We will also discuss how the use of premade video content is being used in classrooms and at a distance. Tools, techniques, and content discussed will be shared on ALE Wiki as an ongoing resource.

Guests:

  • Susan Gaer, Professor of ESL, Santa Ana College School of Continuing Education
  • David Hellman, We Are New York
  • Rebecca Leece, We Are New York
  • Alex Quinn, Project Director, Education Development Center (EDC)
  • Diana Satin, distance-learning instructor and an educational consultant


Facilitator:

Nell Eckersley, Technology and Distance Learning List Moderator, Literacy Information and Communication System

Resources

Tools

Tutorials

Nell Eckersley

Director, NYSED ACCES Regional Adult Education Network of New York City
http://lacnyc.org/nysprojects/nycraen.htm

Moderator, LINCS Technology & Distance Learning Discussion List
http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/technology

Literacy Assistance Center

New York, NY



Day Four: Mobile Learning in Adult Education

Subject: [PD 5858] Day 4: Mobile Learning in Adult Education
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Good day or evening!

For those who would like to review this week's discussions-to-date, visit:
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Using_Video_in_Teaching_and_Professional_Development

The above ALE Wiki section is a discussion archive I've created that I manually update. Posts are sorted by day and threaded by topic.

Today's video PD subscribers chose to discuss is Mobile Learning in Adult Education, produced by OTAN (http://www.otan.us/video/techintegration/phones/110308CellPhones.asx 6:22 minutes).

As you view the video, jot down some notes on scratch paper, things like practices you like or don't like, questions you would like to ask the teacher or students, and other questions or surprises.

Then reply to this email. Tell us your thoughts on any one or more of the following:

  • What did you notice about what the instructors did to integrate cell phones into the classroom? Which activities using cell phones intrigued you most? What practices did you not like, and why?
  • What do you do similarly or what would you have done differently?
  • What surprised you, if anything?
  • What did you notice about the students? What questions would you like to ask the teacher or students? What questions, if any, did the video raise for you?
  • What beliefs about teaching and learning were reinforced, changed, or broadened for you as a result of viewing this video and in following this online discussion?
  • Did a new idea lead to a new question for you? Did a new question lead to a new idea? If so, tell us about it.
  • What steps might you take next?

Thanks...Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS: <http://lincs.ed.gov/> http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD: http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5863] Day 4 Comments on Mobile Learning Video
From: Reyes, Kristi
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

The introduction in the video was great—“90% of our students have cell phones,” not to mention that school would not have to spend penny—something that is very welcome with today’s budget limits. I appreciated the later mention of the outcomes of using cell phones—very useful—when integrating some “fun” new tech tool, we need to remember our outcomes and not just focus on the gadget. The pacing of the video and viewpoints from more than one instructor are wonderful!

To answer today’s questions:

What did you notice about what the instructors did to integrate cell phones into the classroom? Which activities using cell phones intrigued you most? What practices did you not like, and why?

I especially like Ann Marie’s comment about “keeping it simple.” I think this idea should guide any teacher when implementing new techniques or strategies—especially technology—in one’s instruction. I love the ideas presented here by that awesome teacher Jose Mercedes-Lopez (he’s my colleague at MiraCosta College, so of course no bias here ; 0…). I have used Voki but not with cell phones (we have headphone mics that students can use in the lab), so his suggestion is helpful. I’d like to learn more about what he does with texting besides dictations and a few more ways in which he uses Google Voice, but I enjoyed the ideas he did provide. I liked everything but have a couple of comments, below.

What surprised you, if anything?

The one drawback is that, while the video really gets me interested in the possibilities of cell phone use in the classroom, I would need more specific, hands-on training to know how to use this technology rather than just hear and see about it. Although I am an avid technology user in my teaching—as well as having students use it—I have not been so keen on cell phones. The one thing that bothers me is why would you have students text each other to interact if they are sitting next to each other in a classroom? There have been a lot of debate over the years about how technology does not really help folks develop interpersonal skills, something that ESL students in particular, need practice with because many of the features of interpersonal communication differ from country to country (i.e., nonverbal cues, etc.). For ESL, I could see cell phones used more in distance education, such as the situation the instructor Sean mentioned—practicing English while waiting for the bus.

What did you notice about the students? What questions would you like to ask the teacher or students? What questions, if any, did the video raise for you?

I really like seeing the students—their interest and engagement are the major draw in this video. What grabbed me most is hearing from a student, too; it lends much credibility to the topic. What we seem to be missing in adult education is much quantitative (not just qualitative) research into technology use and its impact on learning outcomes… unless I have missed it… I’d like to learn more about what the research says.

What beliefs about teaching and learning were reinforced, changed, or broadened for you as a result of viewing this video and in following this online discussion? What steps might you take next?

I really need to set aside some time for professional development, I realize, and thankfully, with the resources I have learned about here, I can do it in quick 5-minute intervals anywhere, anytime (with internet access, that is). I’ll re-visit all the sites (OTAN, MLoTS, PDK, and New American Horizons) —I’ve bookmarked them (already have the Literacy Tent Wiki bookmarked from a few years ago—thank goodness everything is compiled there!). Goal for coming school year: Watch one video a week. (Gulp… Oh-oh, now I have witnesses!). As for cell phones… OK, I’m convinced… I can now see how cell phones are a great resource for learning, but I’m still not certain I’m hooked.

Thank you for sponsoring these wonderful discussions, and from now on, I hope to be more than a lurker! I can’t wait until the next discussion on using video with students because I have much more experience and am excited to learn about what others are doing and hear about their and their students’ experiences.


Kristi Reyes

Department Chair, Noncredit ESL

Community Learning Center

Oceanside, CA



Video-Based Study Circles

Subject: [PD 5857] How to use video for PD: Video-based study circles
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Colleagues,

I've been thinking about how to use videos for program-based professional development. Here is a model that I would be eager to have you try out, perhaps this fall:

  1. With colleagues at your program or from nearby programs, select a PD topic area that is a priority for everyone, for example, numeracy, English language teaching, or family literacy, a topic area for which PD videos exist.
  1. With your colleagues, narrow the topic if you can so that it is as specific and useful as possible.
  1. Choose (a) video (s) and research and theory reading materials associated with those videos. For example, if you choose this ESL video, http://mlots.org/vermont/louisgiancola.html, there is a lot of theory by Stephen Krashen to read, and some quick pieces are referenced on the web page. If you choose this one, http://mlots.org/wendy/wendy.html there is evidence-based research, the Adult Reading Components study, are referenced on that web page.
  1. Agree to meet three to five times, and agree on what videos and texts will be read.
  1. Choose a discussion leader. (You may find some good discussion facilitation tips from one of the publications at the Study Circles Resource Center http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/HowTo.aspx or the National Issues Forum http://www.nifi.org/ )
  1. Ask the discussion leader to develop or adapt discussion questions for each session (some discussion questions are provided on many of the MLoTS Web pages, for example, on this page http://mlots.org/Elana/Elana.html )
  1. As a group, decide if you will practice a technique or approach with your class, and if so, if in one of your discussion sessions you want to talk about what happened and get suggestions from others.

This model could, of course, be adapted for an online study circle.

If you have comments on the model, please share them here. If you try out the model, let me know. If you have questions that I may be able to help with, email me.

David J. Rosen

djrosen123 at gmail.com


Subject: [PD 5872] Re: How to use video for PD: Video-based study circles
From: Fearnow, Sarah
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

Hi, David and others.

I have a study circle currently on-going, similar to the one you described. Read below for details.

In 2006-2007, I was one of 20 or so teachers in Arizona who participated in the Teachers Investigating Adult Numeracy (TIAN) Project. We were trained by Mary Jane Schmitt of TERC (http://www.terc.edu/ ) in the TIAN philosophy of teaching math to adults and in using the EMPower series of mathematics textbooks. I am now a certified TIAN trainer for the state of Arizona, and as such, I co-facilitate TIAN trainings for teachers around our state. I also lead a TIAN professional learning community (PLC) for my program, Pima College Adult Education, in Tucson.

In our PLC, which meets monthly, teachers share their successes and challenges in implementing TIAN in the classroom, explore TIAN lessons in EMPower, and read and discuss research in teaching math to adults. All PLC participants in our program are paid for their participation in the two-hour monthly meetings and for two hours a month of homework, peer-work, and/or coaching.

I have had my classes videotaped a number of times, mostly by a friend using a cheap camera, but once by the Pima Community College television crew. I am in the process of editing the videos to create a bank of videos to use with my professional learning community and in the state-wide trainings that I help lead. I have shown two video segments so far and have been told by the teachers I work with that they appreciate the opportunity to see TIAN "in action" in the classroom.

I have enjoyed this on-line discussion because I feel I have a lot to learn about how to effectively use the videos I am creating. I appreciate the suggestions offered on pre- and post-viewing questions and activities. Thank you all for your comments.

Sarah Fearnow

GED, Instructor

Pima College Adult Education



Day Five: The Future of Video for Professional Development

Subject: [PD 5869] Day 5: Future of Video for Staff Development
From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

Hello Everyone,

Today's the last day of our guest discussion of Using Video in Teaching and Professional Development, Part I. Part II on Using Video with Adult Learners will begin August 15-19 on the Technology and Distance Learning List (http://lincs.ed.gov/mailman/listinfo/Technology/), moderated by Nell Eckersley.

But in the meantime, I'm wondering what you see as the future for using video for professional development. Is this something your state or regional professional development center or local program will be exploring more? For example, will your state be making videos for PD? Or do you see yourself using this sample model that David Rosen described for video-based study circles (http://lincs.ed.gov/pipermail/professionaldevelopment/2011/005934.html)? Will your program be encouraging teachers to make their own videos for local PD needs and use? Or something else?

And thanks to Kristi Reyes for articulating her goals for using video in the near future. What are yours?

Looking forward,

Jackie

Jackie Taylor

Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS, http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD, http://www.aalpd.org/


Subject: [PD 5871] Re: Day 5: Future of Video for Staff Development
From: Anderson, Philip
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

Dear Interested Parties for PD for Adult Educators All:

As a state staff whose main job is to find and share information with adult ESOL practitioners in Florida, I found this discussion very helpful. Those of you who posted gave useful information can rest assured that it was worth your time and effort.

I really enjoyed watching (almost all) the videos mentioned in everyone's posts. Like Joy said, the video of the Harvard physics professor, although long, was worth watching.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tn1DLFnbGOo

For me, it was reassuring to see a university professor "rediscovering" the basic concepts of learning that we in adult education find so useful. For me, it reinforced the importance of keeping it real. "It" = our interaction with the adults who come to us wanting to learn. "Real" = we are clear about our being equals, and that we respect and share what we have with each other.

The plan that David Rosen laid out in PD #5857 would seem to be one that would benefit local programs. Most adult education centers in our state will be kicking off next month, and there are many opportunities to connect and share with fellow teachers.

Phil Anderson

FLDOE Adult ESOL Program


Subject: [PD 5873] Re: Day 5: Future of Video for Staff Development
From: Judith Diamond
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

The video not only emphasizes teaching to students, but also provides professional development. Do we allow teachers attending PD to discuss, consider, adjust, and implement strategies or do we just tell them what we think they should do?

Judith Diamond

Adult Learning Resource Center, Chicago


Subject: [PD 5876] Day 5: Future of Video for Staff Development
From: Kris Witte
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

Thanks to all for the valuable resources and inspiration for using video in professional development and in mlearning! I plan to include the use of video in the online course I'm designing through my graduate program, Online Teaching and Learning at New Mexico State University.

In New Mexico, we have a professional development program called Regional Educational Technology Assistance (RETA) through New Mexico State University. The program offers a variety of professional development services for educators: http://reta.nmsu.edu/services/index.html

In Texas, A few years ago, I provided face to face professional development for adult education instructors through the Texas Learns "Great Centers": http://www-tcall.tamu.edu/texaslearns/tlgreat.htm At the time, we did some work through email discussion. A challenge then was lack of computer access for instructor use. Mobile learning seems like a promising option for both professional development and learner instruction.

Kris Witte

Vice President, Public Services Alliance (501c3)

kmwitte1 at msn.com

IM: Nmkris (Skype)

My wiki: http://mlearn-examples.wikispaces.com/

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/kris-witte/6/199/4b



Video: A Systematic Approach to Professional Development

Subject: [PD 5864] Using video as part of a systematic approach to professional development and teacher support
From: Powrie, James
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

It has been a pleasure following the discussion and getting a sense of the variety of interests, issues and resources related to using video for professional development. For the past decade I have had the good fortune to be the other half (with Heide Wrigley) of the two-person company we rather grandiosely named Literacywork International (http://literacywork.com/Literacywork.com/Welcome.html).

A few years before Heide and I became partners in life and business, we met as consultants on something called the Cyberstep Project (http://www.cyberstep.org/about/). This was an OVAE-funded project to develop a research-based, systematic approach to creating multimedia learning materials for ABE and ESL learners. The product development partners included the Adult Literacy Media Alliance (product: Web site for their TV 411http://www.tv411.org/ series), Los Angeles Unified School District (product: English for All http://www.myefa.org/login.cfm video series), and OTAN (products: multimedia authoring tools and interactive Web-TV pilot series). Heide and I were the principal authors of the standards documents (http://www.cyberstep.org/papers/) that were to guide product development. As far as we know, only one other product developer has used these standards: Mike Kelly, developer of The Learning Edge (http://www.thewclc.ca/edge/) in Canada (whose work, by the way, we like a lot). Nevertheless, the standards and the rigor entailed in developing them have shaped our work ever since.

Consequently, we tend to view professional development as a component of a comprehensive and systematic approach to teacher training and support—one based on sound learning theory and practical application - providing both sustained training and immediate just-in-time support when needed.

A few years ago we decided to try to put together such a system—one that was comprehensive but simple enough to be useful. We named the system ESL by Design (http://literacywork.com/Literacywork.com/ESL_by_Design.html) and, with limited resources, have been fleshing it out ever since. The current and incomplete version of the system is based on a basic but adaptable lesson flow and a series of strategies that can be used as part of a lesson. The big idea was to put in one place descriptions of useful strategies, sample materials that teachers could use both for instruction and inspiration, and videos of master teachers demonstrating each of the strategies. We envisioned that these materials could be not only the core of sustained professional development, but also a resource that teachers might use as a reference the night before teaching a class or as a basis for study groups, etc. Our efforts were stalled by the challenge of obtaining quality videos of quality teaching, although a number of these videos (http://literacywork.com/Literacywork.com/Videos/Videos.html) are available on our website. In short, the grand task has proven to be too great for the two of us—so far. However, along the way, we have gained a few insights into how to shoot and use videos for professional development.

In that context, I would like to respond to some questions asked by David Rosen on day one:

Can a set of well-prepared videos introduce teachers to new standards or methods for teaching and learning in a way that just reading about the standards and methods cannot?

Absolutely! As many have stated here, seeing something being done is often more effective that simply reading about it and of course using short explanatory text along with the video can help set the context for the video and point out key aspects of the video. David used the term "well-prepared" in describing the videos and I thing that is critically important. The videos don't have to be slick but should be adequately lit and most importantly have quality sound. In my opinion, videos that show both teacher prompts and student responses are preferable. Tight editing is also important. The editor should show enough of a scene to make the point then move on.

Should teachers be encouraged to make videos of their own -- and their colleagues' -- teaching? If so, what training do they need to do this well? What equipment do they need? Should they edit them, too? How should the videos be used?

Making videos isn't rocket science and most teachers with the right training and gear can make videos of decent quality. There are of course multiple uses for teacher videos and the purpose should drive the quality. Taping a teacher to use as a coaching device doesn't entail much more than putting a basic video camera on a tripod and pushing the button. No editing is required and unless the camera is under an AC duct (which does happen all too often) the sound from the camera should be adequate. Creating a video to highlight a teaching strategy for others to observe and potentially replicate requires a good deal more work and more complex gear. The video should be engaging to the viewer. Not only must the teacher audio be of a higher quality, but it is important to hear student responses. Seeing interplay between teacher and students makes the process more comprehensible, but requires two cameras and editing two video and sound. If you are using two cameras, I've found it useful to put a wireless mic on the teacher and a zoom mic on the camera pointed at students. The teacher audio will be great and the student audio will be adequate. Without wiring the whole room, that's about as good as you can get. Unfortunately, cameras that accept external microphones are more expensive than standard home systems. Some colleges and districts have this equipment for teachers to check-out. But producing quality videos for presentation to others is an expensive and time-consuming effort.

Should The U.S. Department of Education sponsor and make available -- at no charge -- high quality classroom videos that could be used in face-to-face or online courses? Should state PD centers do this? Should some other organization support this? If so, which one(s)?

As has been mentioned in the discussion, teachers and other enthusiasts across the country and indeed in other countries are producing helpful teacher training videos. These are posted on useful websites and accessed by increasing numbers of teachers. But the quality is sporadic and the likelihood of finding an appropriate video about a given topic is hit or miss. Yes, I strongly believe we need a significant, sufficiently funded effort to develop a broad range of high-quality videos, organized in a logical manner, and readily available for teachers and professional developers to access and use in multiple way - for free. It would require significant funding from a consortium of foundations or government funding of some sort. There is precedent in both government and private funders for such efforts, however, it seems likely that significant government funding would be hard to find. The pitch to foundations is simple: We have a rapidly growing need for English language instruction in nearly every state in the nation. Our economy depends increasingly on a population that is new to English but must learn it to be successful. Many teachers (as well as volunteer tutors) are new to ESL instruction. They need substantial training and support to be effective. A national strategy-based video resource can be used in a wide variety of ways to accelerate teacher preparation and improve day-to-day instruction.


Jim Powrie

PD participant

jim at literacywork.com



Video for Site-Based Professional Development

Subject: [PD 5866] Video for site based and other PD
From: Wrigley, Heide
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2011

Dear video PD participants. I'm one of the guest discussants and apologize for coming into this discussion late. I've enjoyed the discussion so far but wanted to weigh in on earlier discussions on how we use video in PD.


As part of Literacywork International, we've produced a number of (free) videos for teaching low literate adults that we are using in PD sessions across sites and in site based PD. For example, as part of our PD sessions with Socorro, Texas, we worked with the teachers to develop lesson plans and strategy lessons that can serve as a illustrations for other teachers on how to implement a particular technique (We did quite a few Chalk Talks).

This approach has worked really well as teachers spend time grappling with what a lesson might look like and how to set up a strategy so the flow is clear. As we film, any party (students, teachers, or coach (me) or videographer) can say "cut" and we start all over. So the videos end up feeling more like "situation comedies" (that also reshoot in front of a live audience when someone flubs their lines) than documentaries that catch the nitty gritty of every day teaching (I believe there is room for both).

The videos are then edited to cut them down further to a length that highlights a strategy but still shows students in action as well and discussed with all the teachers on site. In the discussions, we stress the underlying principles that guide the selection and use of certain strategies—strategies that show promise in helping low literate learners find their voice and express ideas in spite of not having a great deal of English in their linguistic repertoire from which to draw.

We now use these videos frequently as part of sustained professional development under a contract with the Texas GREAT Centers, using PD strategies similar to those outlined by David, Marian and others. But we also ask teachers to try out some of the instructional strategies highlighted in the videos in their classrooms and report back on how they adapted them, how they worked, and what student responses have been.

If you'd like to see some of these videos, you can either access them on www.literacywork.com (click in videos) or on YouTube (you'll need to find "Literacywork" first and then look for Chalk Talk.

Heide Spruck Wrigley - Guest Discussant

Literacywork International

Mesilla, New Mexico



Mobile Learning Resources

Subject: [PD 5868] Mobile Learning Resources—how teachers can learn more about using cell phones for mlearning
From: David J. Rosen
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

PD Colleagues,

For those who want to learn more about—and try out—mobile learning in the adult education classroom, here are some resources to learn more:

Cell phone survey to find out what hardware your students have and how they use it
https://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AW_9G5eUBhMzZGZrcmdiN3NfOXhwNnhuM2g&hl=en

The Mobile learning section of the Adult Literacy Education Wiki
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Newtechnologies

Using Mobile Phones in Adult Education Classes
http://mlearninginadulted.wikispaces.com/

These—and other resources—were found or created by an international group of teachers, professional developers and mlearning product developers who have an adult education mlearning online community of practice. It’s for those who are seriously exploring, actively using and/or creating mlearning applications and who will commit to engaging in the discussion and helping develop new resources. If you would like to join this group, email me about how you are currently using or plan to use Mlearning with adult learners and how you think this group might be useful to you.

David J. Rosen

djrosen123 at gmail.com


Subject: [PD 5874] Re: Mobile Learning Resources—how teachers can learn more
From: Branka Marceta
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

To add to David's excellent list of resources regarding use of mobile phones in adult education, here's a link to a wiki page that was created around the online workshops that Susan Gaer has done for OTAN and her conference presentations about this topic.

The wiki is used for other workshops and presentation we, OTANers, do on this topic. Susan and others identified the following issues to consider and activities to engage in:

  • Understanding features of the variety of phones our learners will bring to the classroom
  • Establishing rules of use, or cell phone etiquette  
  • How to use texting
  • How to use the photo camera feature
  • How to use audio recording feature
  • How to use phone audio in conjunction with various Web sites in the context of teaching and learning
  • Other features and possible uses in education
  • Privacy and safety issues

This content is inclusive of those with so called "feature phones", or non-smart phones. There is a very short section about various applications for smart phones.
http://timac.wikispaces.com/Cell+Phones+in+the+Classroom

In the context of our discussion about Video in PD, it would be interesting to see future teacher and staff developer created videos of how their programs take advantage of this whole new BYOD (bring your own device) movement in technology integration circles.

~Branka Marceta

OTAN http://www.otan.us

Guest Discussant

Using Video in Teaching and Staff Development, Part I: Using Videos for Instructor PD  


Subject: [PD 5875] Re: Mobile Learning Resources—how teachers can learn more about using cell phones for mlearning
From: Ann Damrau
Date: Friday, July 29, 2011

Thanks for the cell phone survey! The only additional thing I would suggest to add is: "Who is your cell phone service provider?" Knowing the service provider allows me to send a short message to a group of students from my email.
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/email-to-sms/

Ann Marie Holzknecht

Professor, ESL

San Diego Continuing Education


 
Subject: [PD 5880] Discussion Thanks! / 5 Minute Feedback

From: Jackie A. Taylor
Date: Monday, August 1, 2011

Good day or evening!


Thank you to our guests Branka Marceta, David Rosen, Marian Thacher, and Heide Spruck Wrigley, for leading an informative and insightful discussion last week on Using Video for Teaching and Staff Development, Part I. All discussion threads are now compiled and can be found online at:
http://wiki.literacytent.org/index.php/Using_Video_in_Teaching_and_Professional_Development 


I will let you know when our discussion summary is live on the LINCS website.


Please reply (by Friday) off list to one or more of the following questions (email Jackie@jataylor.net). I'll use your feedback to improve future guest discussion opportunities:

  1. What did you like most about this guest discussion and/or the discussion format?
  2. What would you like to see changed about future guest discussions?
  3. What were your key take-aways?
  4. What would you like to see happen in follow up to this discussion?
  5. What are your next steps, if any, to explore the use of video for staff development?

I always enjoy learning online with you! Let's keep the conversations moving so that we can continue to benefit from one another's experiences.


Jackie Taylor


Professional Development List Facilitator

LINCS: http://lincs.ed.gov/

AALPD: http://www.aalpd.org/

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