Teaming Up for 21st Century Teaching and Learning: What Research and Practice Reveal about Professional Learning

This publication aims to shed light on the impact of professional learning communities from an integrative perspective, one that draws on each of important and likely symbiotic outcomes. The report draws on two equally valid sources of knowledge: published research and skilled practice.
Resource URL:
Author(s): 
Thomas Carroll
Kathleen Fulton
Hanna Doerr
Author(s) Organizational Affiliation: 
National Commision on Teaching and America's Future
Published: 
2010
Number of Pages: 
18
Product Type: 
Abstract: 

This publication aims to shed light on the impact of professional learning communities from an integrative perspective, one that draws on each of important and likely symbiotic outcomes. The report draws on two equally valid sources of knowledge: published research and skilled practice.

What the Experts Say: 

This paper is a basic introduction to learning teams and provides an evidence base to validate the creation of learning teams, describing six principles that are guidelines for building collaborative learning teams. The list of resources can lead to further exploration of the evidence base and the how-to of building learning teams. The described theory is innovative, easily implemented and beneficial to the educational community as a whole.  This resource gathers data over the course of several years and in so doing reflects on the evolution of the idea of communities of practice or learning communities.  Even though the theories and methodologies are abbreviated they are clearly set out. 

Adult Educators, even more so than traditional K-12 teachers, are sometimes subject to isolation and neglect from the field.  Correctional Educators are particularly vulnerable to these problems as their teaching environment is by necessity isolated -- cut-off from the general population.   The authors talk openly and optimistically about successfully moving teaching into the 21st Century and then proceed to set out exactly how it can be done: communities of practice. This resource, made widely available, can do much to allow educators and administrators to reach out to one another and embrace already formed groups, or to create their own.

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