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Assessment Strategies and Reading Profiles

Reading Profiles

A reading profile is a picture of a reader's strengths and needs in the component skills. It can be presented in several ways.

Here is an example of a reading profile presented as a table:

Reading Skill (Component)
Score (Grade Equivalent)
Word Recognition 4.0
Spelling 2.0
Word Meaning (Vocabulary) 10.0
Silent Reading Comprehension 8.0
Oral Reading Rate 120 words per minute



We can also use bar graphs to present the same reading profile. (We graph oral reading rate separately because it is measured in different units—words per minute [wpm] instead of GEs [Grade Equivalents].) Here is the sample reading profile presented as a bar graph:


Sample Reading Profile
Reading Skills Components and Grade Equivalent scores

Sample Reading Profile
Reading Skills Components and Grade Equivalent scores

On this Web site, we present profiles as tables and line graphs (except oral reading rate, which we will always show as a bar graph). Here is the sample profile shown as a line graph:

Sample Reading Profile
Reading Skills Components and Grade Equivalent scores

Why are reading profiles important?

  • Profiles provide a guide for instruction. Once a teacher has assessed a learner's reading skills, he or she can then direct instruction to those skills that need strengthening.
  • Profiles illustrate a learner's pattern of scores on skills that underlie reading ability.
  • Profiles are a tool for classroom practitioners and programs. Learners with similar strengths and needs can be grouped for more focused instruction. For example, the STAR Tool Kit uses profiles for placement and instructional grouping.

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