The What, Why, Who, and How of Blended Learning for Adult Education

This guide is for teachers, tutors, and administrators of programs and schools who provide adult basic skills education and who are hoping to initiate or improve blended learning for their students.

Author(s)
David J. Rosen
Jen Vanek
Author(s) Organizational Affiliation
World Education
Publication Year
2020
Resource Type
Professional Development
Number of Pages
32
Abstract

Blended learning combines in-person and online instruction in order to extend learning outside of face-to-face classes or tutorials, differentiate instruction, or offer alternatives to reach unserved learners. This guide is for teachers, tutors, and administrators of programs and schools1 who provide adult basic skills education and who are hoping to initiate or improve blended learning for their students, including English for immigrants (ESL, ESOL, or ELL), adult literacy, adult basic education (ABE), adult secondary education (ASE), and transition to higher education. The key questions addressed are;

  • How can blended learning help with what and who is taught?
  • Why use a blended learning approach?
  • How can a program get started?
  • What does blended learning look like?
  • What online resources work with blended learning?
  • What are some common challenges in implementing blended learning?

The appendices includes a list of hybrid and blended learning tools used by adult basic skills programs.
 

What the experts say

The What, Why, Who, and How of Blended Learning for Adult Basic Skills Learners is a well-organized primer on blended learning for adult education. The authors outline clear, actionable steps for blended learning implementation and include relevant links to organizations and content that can support on-going professional development in the area of blended/hybrid learning. The explanation of blended learning and the research-based evidence that supports it’s usage particularly in promoting adult basic skills is presented in a practitioner-friendly manner. Brand-name recommendations are pertinent to utilization in real-time applications and should be interpreted as such. Overall, the comprehensive “how-to” approach along with examples, resources and ways to address challenges allow for readers to customize blended learning and apply the best practices as needed.

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